HOSPICE CARE PLUS INC
208 Kidd Dr
Berea KY 40403
Contact Information
Nonprofit HOSPICE CARE PLUS INC
Address 208 Kidd Dr
Berea, KY 40403
Phone (859) 986-1500
Fax 859 986-2546
Contact Name Chasity Coleman
At A Glance
Former Names
Hospice of Madison County; Madison County Hospice; Hospice of the Kentucky River
Other ways to donate, support, or volunteer Donors may submit by phone, e-mail, check, in-kind and may designate for a program, county or special need.  We do have many volunteer opportunities and welcome new volunteers to serve in patient care, administrative support, inpatient facility support, fund raising or many other ways.
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses - All Years
Expense Breakdown - Recent Year
Statements
Mission Statement Hospice Care Plus empowers those we serve to live the highest quality of life, respecting their values, beliefs, needs, and goals through specialized care, education, resources, and grief support.
Background Statement

We are a non-profit organization founded in Madison County by concerned community members in 1981. For many years, these founders and other volunteers cared for Madison Countians on their own time and did not receive a salary. Although we did begin hiring paid staff several years later, we’re proud that our volunteers have always outnumbered our paid staff. That’s still true today. We are proud to have 123 volunteers as part of our family of staff.

We later expanded our care to counties that did not have an existing hospice provider: Estill, Jackson, Lee, Owsley, and Rockcastle. We continue to serve these counties today.

We expanded our programs and services, too. At our founding, we offered basic hospice care in the homes of patients and their families. Now, we offer comprehensive hospice care at home, inpatient hospice care at our Compassionate Care Center, a home-based palliative care program, bereavement care for our hospice program and for the community, and workshops and support for family caregivers. Of these services, only hospice care receives reimbursement from Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance. Our other programs are offered to meet community needs, are provided at no cost, and are supported solely through donations.

Because we wish to hold ourselves to the highest standard of care, we have been voluntarily accredited by the Joint Commission since 1998. We are also certified by Medicare and Medicaid. We’re members of the Kentucky Association of Hospice and Palliative Care, the Kentucky Hospice Network, and the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization.

Impact Statement

Hospice Care Plus is the sole provider of hospice, palliative, and bereavement care in Estill, Jackson, Lee, Madison, Owsley, and Rockcastle counties in central and eastern Kentucky. Care and services are provided to all, even those who cannot pay and do not have insurance. We’re a recipient of the prestigious Hospice Honors and Hospice Honors Elite awards, national awards based exclusively on feedback from those whose loved ones were cared for by hospices.

We care for an average of 120 patients & families per day, in their homes, through our hospice and palliative programs. Our Compassionate Care Center for inpatient hospice care serves an average of 7 patients and families per day.

In 2018, we proudly dedicated 77% of our revenues directly to care and services for our patients and families.

In addition to hospice and palliative care, we support grieving children and adults through one-on-one sessions, school-based support groups, a monthly grief support group for adults, and crafting grief groups such as shadow box workshops for both adults and children.

We also aim to support caregivers, even when their loved ones are not under hospice or palliative care. We offer three-to-four caregiver workshops yearly on topics such as safe medication management, nutrition tips, understanding Medicare, advanced care planning, and much more.

Our speakers bureau gives more than 100 presentations each year in our community, sharing our expertise with audiences at no cost. Presentations include advanced care planning, how to support the grieving, hospice fact and fiction, health care and the elderly, end-of-life care concerns, and how to make a bucket list that matters.

Needs Statement
Because we're committed to remaining a non-profit hospice organization, providing programs and care regardless of insurance status and ability to pay, community support is essential. Two of our programs, bereavement and palliative care, are not reimbursed by Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance and are offered at no cost to those who need them. Therefore, they exist solely because of community support. And, although home hospice care and inpatient care at our Compassionate Care Center are reimbursed by Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance, our standard of care goes far beyond their regulations and their reimbursement rates. For instance, Medicare's reimbursement for hospice care is a flat rate that assumes our nurses visit patients once every two weeks at minimum. However, our internal policy has always been that nurses must visit at least once weekly and more as needed. (We average 2 weekly nursing visits, more than 3 times what Medicare funds and requires). We approach patient care in this way because we believe that quality of life and comfort depend on excellent nursing, medical, psychosocial, and spiritual care, and that caregivers need a tremendous amount of support and information. Donations allow us to continue offering this high, personal, compassionate level of care for our community.  
CEO/Executive Director Statement

Hospice Care Plus is honored to serve patients and families in Estill, Jackson, Lee, Madison, Owsley and Rockcastle Counties, six rural counties of Kentucky. Our staff and volunteers focus on the individual families and what is most important to them. Since 1981, Hospice Care Plus has added programs to better meet the needs of our service area including a palliative care program, durable medical equipment in-house services, bereavement outreach program, volunteer programs, crisis intervention care, dedicated staff, and our free-standing hospice inpatient facility, the Compassionate Care Center. Support from the community has made a tremendous difference, allowing Hospice Care Plus the resources to meet patient’s needs and extend care to all regardless of insurance status and ability to pay.

We hold ourselves accountable, on a voluntary basis, to the highest standards of care by participating in accreditation with the Joint Commission since 1997. We are also certified by Medicare and Medicaid. We are members of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, Kentucky Association of Hospice and Palliative Care, and the Kentucky Hospice Network. 
 
We provide ongoing education and training to our staff and volunteers and offer over 100 educational offerings to the community each year.
 
Board Chair Statement
As Board President, I strongly support the mission and philosophy of Hospice Care Plus and have seen first hand the tremendous difference the care and services make for a patient and family.  My personal experience with a close friend that had hospice has helped me understand the impact that hospice care has on the quality of life for the patient and the much needed support for the family members and the caregivers.  
 
Service Categories
Secondary Organization Category Human Services / Hospice
Tertiary Organization Category Diseases Disorders & Medical Disciplines /
Geographic Areas Served
Areas
Estill County
Jackson County
Lee County
Madison County
Owsley County
Rockcastle County
Hospice Care Plus offers home hospice, palliative, and bereavement care and services to Estill, Jackson, Lee, Madison, Owsley and Rockcastle Counties.  Our hospice inpatient facility in Richmond, the Compassionate Care Center, serves hospice patients from any area.
Impact Questions
GoalsHelpWhat is the organization aiming to accomplish? This is the organization's ultimate goal for intended impact.
1.Broaden our grief and loss services to the community through specialized grief groups and workshops, including partnering with schools in our service area to provide on-site grief groups for children.  2. Support our staff and volunteers by increasing professional development & ongoing education opportunities, including increasing the number of staff certified in hospice and palliative care. 3. Expand support for family caregivers in our service area by offering family caregivers workshops tailored to the needs of caregivers whose loved ones are not yet appropriate for hospice care. 4. Increase our patients & families' access to Crisis Intervention Care at home, by adding additional staffing to meet needs. 5. Review our nurse-aid scheduling to ensure that it best meets the needs of the patients and families we serve. 6. Increase the number of visits our direct-care staff make to patients & families when death is near, to ensure adequate support, teaching, and comfort. 7. Implement new cost-savings measures to support our financial health and ensure we can fund our mission. 8. Offer additional teaching and training to our staff to ensure full compliance with all HIPAA standards.
 
StrategiesHelpWhat are the organization's strategies for its stated long-term goals?

1. Broaden Grief & Loss Services: Strategies are to increase volunteer support to the professional bereavement team through a specialized training. An additional 12 bereavement volunteers allows us to increase the type and frequency of support, from bereavement phone calls and literature mailings to support groups and workshops. We will also restructure slightly to allot a portion of our Volunteer Coordinator’s time to supporting the bereavement program. 2. Ongoing Education: One strategy is to research the time and expense of certification by discipline, use that information to create a fair system for incentivizing certification, and include in our 2020-2021 budgets a reasonable amount to fund this initiative. A second strategy is to increase the number of hours available to plan and implement quick inservices for clinical staff throughout the year, and to offer those based on our annual educational needs assessment survey. 3. Support for Family Caregivers: Our primary strategy is to use a limited number of direct-care staff hours to support family caregiver workshops, and to realign the priority areas for our outreach staff to promote focus on this goal. 4. Increase Access to Crisis Intervention Care (CIC): Primary strategies are to increase staffing to meet this need, to report on the number of CIC hour provided each month to ensure we’re offering this service, and to initiate Monday-morning huddles during which patient care staff will review who among their patients and families may need CIC. 5. Nurse-Aid Scheduling: Strategies are to ask the nurse-aid discipline and nursing discipline to discuss alternative scheduling models and to shift from self-scheduling to nursing-led scheduling in collaboration with the nurse-aid team. 6. Increase Visits at the End of Life: Our strategy is to utilize an audit schedule to determine how many visits are made during the hours and days preceding death, then to set a reasonable goal and audit schedule to ensure we’re meeting the goal. 7. Cost-Savings Measures: We will target medical supplies to see if it’s possible to obtain these at a lower cost by reviewing the top-20 supply items and evaluating other options, while continuing to provide quality supplies that meet patient needs. 8. Increase HIPAA Training to Protect Patient Information: Our strategy is to modify our 2019-2020 ongoing education plan, our new employee training, and our required annual education modules to ensure that all include training information related to protecting the privacy of patient information.

CapabilitiesHelpWhat are the organization’s capabilities for doing this? What resources, capacities, and connections support its progress towards long-term goals?

1. An excellent volunteer pool of over 123 individuals and a highly experienced staff. 2. Partnerships with UK, the Kentucky Hospice Network, and the National Association of Hospice and Palliative Care that gives us access to experts in the hospice, palliative, and bereavement fields to enrich our education and training initiatives. 3. High family satisfaction scores (above the national average) that serves to make families for former hospice patients strong ambassadors for hospice and palliative care in our communities. 4. Long-term leadership in our directors and at the board level that brings stability, experience, and expertise to our efforts. 5. Strong community support and financial stewardship that allows us access to the funds necessary to maintain and improve patient, family, and community care efforts. 6. A good relationship with foundations to help us plan new programs and strengthen existing ones.

IndicatorsHelpHow will the organization know if it is making progress? What are the key qualitative and quantitative indicators against which the organization assesses its progress toward its intended impact?

Because regulatory changes happen frequently in healthcare, our strategic plans are typically two-year plans. There are 7 key ways we monitor progress toward our strategic goals: 1) EMR audits to help us determine the effectiveness and efficacy of care and programs, 2) a review of our plan, goals, and progress at every biweekly leadership meeting, 3) an update on our strategic plan at each of our 6 all-staff meetings during the year, 4) feedback and progress discussions in discipline and committee meetings (monthly), 5) our performance improvement / quality monitoring program, 6) a monthly dashboard that allows us to see our quantitative progress in all major areas (patients served, admissions, discharges, length of stay, financial health indicators, retention rate, educational offerings, fundraising ratio, and much more), and 7) participation in national data collection regarding family satisfaction that allows us to benchmark ourselves against local, state, and national hospice programs in terms of family satisfaction with our care and services.

ProgressHelpWhat has and hasn’t been accomplished so far?

Our ultimate intended impact is to meet the needs of the seriously ill and the bereaved in our service area through hospice, palliative, and bereavement programs, and to do so with high quality, compassionate, expert care that is provided to all, regardless of insurance status or ability to pay. The strategic planning goals we’ve listed are steps toward those mission-based goals.

Bereavement Goal: Already, we’ve trained two groups of volunteers to help us add many more supportive mail and phone contacts, added a monthly support group that is open both to families of former hospice patients and to the community, conducted one school-based grief group for children in conjunction with a Family Resource Center, scheduled one-on-one support sessions for children utilizing pet therapy, and scheduled our first Shadow Box Workshop, a tactile way to address grief and loss for those who aren’t comfortable with support groups. Professional Development Goal:  In 2019, we’ve more than doubled inservices and we’ve partnered with the Kentucky Hospice Network to provide all-day, intensive workshops focused on critical topics. Our next step is to continue our research into certification programs for clinical staff. We’ve created a library of the available hospice & palliative certifications for each discipline, their requirements, timelines, and costs. Our leadership team will review, create a suggested incentive plan, incorporate related costs into our budget plan for 2020, and then solicit input. One concern is that the financial impact will be higher than is manageable or sustainable, in which case we will discuss other creative ways to support certification. Family Caregiver Goal: This is related to research that, when families initiate hospice involvement, they engage hospice and palliative care earlier, have better outcomes, and are more satisfied with their care. A key way to increase the number of families who contact their local hospices is to build relationships with family caregivers BEFORE they need us. In 2018, we initiated Family Caregiver Workshops with max capacity at each offering. In 2019, we began offering monthly inservices to Senior Citizens Centers in our service area. Crisis Intervention Care (CIC) Goal: This goal is related to providing high quality, compassionate, expert care for those we serve. CIC involves placing a combination of nurses and nurse aids in patient homes for several consecutive hours in a 24-hour period. It is initiated when the patient has an intractable symptom that, without intensive management at home, would require inpatient care. Since most families choose hospice because they want to remain at home for their last months, it’s essential to make CIC available. In the past, we’ve struggled to maintain appropriate staffing due to fluctuations in demand. So far this year, we’ve more than doubled the CIC services we’ve been able to offer our patients and families.


Board Chair
Board Chair Ms. Donna Angel
Company Affiliation Community Trust Bank
Term Jan 2019 to Dec 2020
Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Ms. Donna AngelMgr. Community Trust BankVoting
Mr. Justin DixonCitizens Guaranty BankVoting
Mr. Greg GerardBaptist Health RichmondVoting
Ms. Lisa JonesEKUVoting
Mr. Tim JordanBerea CollegeVoting
Ms. Cheri Murrey LeeRetired School TeacherVoting
Mr. Mike MaysOwsley County Circuit ClerkVoting
Mrs. Gail McGillis RN,MSNCEO-Hospice Care PlusExofficio
Ms. Nancy MullinsRetiredVoting
Ms. Michelle H. OsborneHardy OilVoting
Ms. Jerri Lynn SmithRetiredVoting
Ms. Jean SpurlockJackson County Board of EducationVoting
Ms. Terri TateRetiredVoting
Mr. Jeff Van WinklePeoples Bank of Madison CountyVoting
Ms. Kay VickersPeoples Rural Telephone CooperativeVoting
Ms. Angela WoodsFarmers State BankVoting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity. Add number
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 16
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 5
Female 11
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 93%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 6
Board Co-Chair
Board CoChair Ms. Lisa Foley
Company Affiliation Baldwin CPAs
Term Jan 2012 to Dec 2014
Standing Committees
Advisory Board / Advisory Council
Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction
Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)
CEO/Executive Director
Executive Director Gail McGillis CEO
Term Start Aug 1994
Email gail.mcgillis@hospicecp.org
Experience
Gail McGillis, Hospice’s CEO, came to the organization after
a 15-year career as a nurse administrator in various settings, including the University of Kentucky, Washington D.C.’s Capitol Hill Hospital, and the University of California, San Francisco.
 
In her 24-year tenure with Hospice Care Plus, and in collaboration
with the staff and Board, the organization has experienced significant growth and success. The staff has more than quadrupled. The number of patients served each day is up by 130%. We voluntarily became accredited with the Joint Commission. Programs and services have been added to meet patient and family needs, and to make Hospice Care Plus more efficient: a pharmacy program, a palliative care program, the Compassionate Care Center inpatient facility, grief support, an in-house durable medical equipment company, the We Honor Veterans program, and much more.   

Her leadership in the hospice industry has been recognized
at both state and national levels. Gail is a past president of both the
Kentucky Hospice Network and the Kentucky Association of Hospice and Palliative Care. She is also a past recipient of the Distinguished Leader award, presented by the Kentucky Association of Hospice and Palliative Care, and was asked by the National Association of Hospice and Palliative Care to serve on its education committee.




.
 
Staff
Full Time Staff 76
Part Time Staff 22
Volunteers 131
Contractors 5
Retention Rate 88%
Management Reports to Board? Yes
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander 3
Caucasian 88
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 2
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 12
Female 86
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
NonManagement Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Description
Home Hospice Care is our main program and brings specialized medical care into the home setting. We offer home hospice care to approximately 93 patients daily in our service area. Home hospice care is a patient-family-centered approach to care focused on specialized symptom control, quality of life, and support of the caregiver and family. We empower patient and family to embrace life and living in these months, focusing on goals, experiences, and special wishes. Our care team-nurse, social worker, chaplain, nurse aid, volunteer, and more-make frequent visits to work with the family on a plan of care determined by their needs, hopes, wishes, and values.


 

Category Health Care, General/Other Home Health Care
Population Served General/Unspecified, Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens, Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short Term Success Along the way, smaller successes often happen, such as helping patient-family access medical benefits or coverage, supporting them with emergent needs such as utility payments or groceries, and helping the patient realize special wishes, such as taking a trip with their family.
Program Long term Success We define success by 1: patients needs were met, especially in terms of pain and symptom control, 2: caregiver's needs were met, 3: family's needs were met. Typically, this means we were able to keep the patient at home for his/her last several months of life (no ER visits or hospitalizations), the caregiver felt comfortable and confident providing care due to good education and support, and the family was supported after the loss through our bereavement program. 
Program Success Monitored By All of our program utilize similar monitoring common to health care settings: a Performance Improvement (Quality Enhancement) Committee; audits focused on specific topics such as patient falls, pain control effectiveness, etc., and a post-audit plan of correction to address any concerns; and participation in both national and local satisfaction surveys, such as the national family satisfaction survey for hospice, which benchmarks us against national, state, and local averages, and our own bereavement, palliative, volunteer, staff, and referral source satisfaction surveys.
Examples of Program Success The best example of our program's success is our classification as both a Hospice Honors Recipient and a Hospice Honors Elite recipient. Both are based on our outcomes on the national satisfaction survey conducted with families of former hospice patients. To receive Hospice Honors, a hospice must perform above the national average on the majority of indicators. To receive Elite status, a hospice must perform above the national average on all indicators.
Description
Our Compassionate Care Center is a freestanding, hospice inpatient facility. Its purpose is to offer general inpatient care for hospice patients with a symptom that can't be managed at home and respite care, and to do so in a specialized environment that continues the hospice philosophy from the home to the inpatient setting. Since hospice care's main focus is to allow patients and families to remain at home, we designed the Center to look and feel as much like home as possible, for those days when patient-family needs make it impossible to remain at home. Each room allows patients access to a private patio, there are no visitor restrictions, pets may visit, and food is offered based on appetite and preferences. The average length of stay is 6 days, and about 55% of patients return home to continue hospice care.
 
 
Category Health Care, General/Other Inpatient/Hospital Care
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled, Adults, Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short Term Success Pain and symptoms controlled, caregiver can have a break to address his/her own health needs and recharge batteries, psychosocial and spiritual concerns addressed while on site, satisfaction rates are high
Program Long term Success Long-term, success is defined by: 1) Continuing to offer respite care at our Center (optional and expensive, but we're committed) 2) Give hospitalization alternative to hospice patients and families 3) Look and feel like home
Program Success Monitored By

All of our program utilize similar monitoring common to health care settings: a Performance Improvement (Quality Enhancement) Committee; audits focused on specific topics such as patient falls, pain control effectiveness, etc., and a post-audit plan of correction to address any concerns; and participation in both national and local satisfaction surveys, such as the national family satisfaction survey for hospice, which benchmarks us against national, state, and local averages, and our own bereavement, palliative, volunteer, staff, and referral source satisfaction surveys.

Examples of Program Success

The best example of our program's success is our classification as both a Hospice Honors Recipient and a Hospice Honors Elite recipient. Both are based on our outcomes on the national satisfaction survey conducted with families of former hospice patients. To receive Hospice Honors, a hospice must perform above the national average on the majority of indicators. To receive Elite status, a hospice must perform above the national average on all indicators.

Description
Our Bereavement Program focuses on providing grief support to caregivers and family members of hospice patients. This begins when we admit a patient and continues for a minimum of 13 months after the patient passes away. Our goal is to help caregivers and families understand normal reactions to grief, identify and express feelings associated with the loss of a loved one, assist their ability to live without the deceased, transform the pain of loss into a renewed hope for living and, if needed, refer to professional counseling services to address clinical depression. We achieve these with both adults and children through one-on-one support sessions, supportive and educational mailings, supportive phone calls, monthly support groups, and special worskhops. We also extend our bereavement services to the community with school-based support groups and inclusion in our monthly support groups and workshops. 

Category None of the above
Population Served Adults, Children and Youth (0 - 19 years), Families
Program Short Term Success Families participate in the program, are responsive, and are satisfied with services.
Program Long term Success We help the bereaved in our service area manage their normal response to loss with information and support.
Program Success Monitored By

All of our program utilize similar monitoring common to health care settings: a Performance Improvement (Quality Enhancement) Committee; audits focused on specific topics such as patient falls, pain control effectiveness, etc., and a post-audit plan of correction to address any concerns; and participation in both national and local satisfaction surveys, such as the national family satisfaction survey for hospice, which benchmarks us against national, state, and local averages, and our own bereavement, palliative, volunteer, staff, and referral source satisfaction surveys.

Examples of Program Success

The best example of our program's success is our classification as both a Hospice Honors Recipient and a Hospice Honors Elite recipient. Both are based on our outcomes on the national satisfaction survey conducted with families of former hospice patients. To receive Hospice Honors, a hospice must perform above the national average on the majority of indicators. To receive Elite status, a hospice must perform above the national average on all indicators.

Description

Palliative care focuses on reducing the severity of illness symptoms and enhancing quality of life for those with a chronic, progressive illness. Many with life-limiting or other serious diseases have difficulty navigating the health care system. As a result, patients and families may feel overwhelmed as they attempt to cope with the immense burden of a very serious illness. These complicated needs often lead to unnecessary medical office visits and hospitalizations. The goal of palliative care is to provide physical, emotional, and spiritual support to patients and their families. Palliative care can be offered alongside curative treatment and is commonly provided at home, at a hospital or at a nursing home. 

Palliative Care provides a medical director, registered nurse, social worker, and volunteer. The physician and nurse assist with the diagnosis and treatment of pain and other distressing symptoms. In short, the patient and family will have a network of support provided them in the comfort of their home, and care among primary physicians and specialists will be well coordinated.

 

Category Diseases, Disorders & Medical Disciplines, General/Other
Program Short Term Success We maintain a census of 30 patients per day, have a plan of care for each that meets their needs, and discharge once the plan of care is met with referral to follow-up services as needed.
Program Long term Success Those with a chronic, progressive illness will receive support and access to resources.
Program Success Monitored By

All of our program utilize similar monitoring common to health care settings: a Performance Improvement (Quality Enhancement) Committee; audits focused on specific topics such as patient falls, pain control effectiveness, etc., and a post-audit plan of correction to address any concerns; and participation in both national and local satisfaction surveys, such as the national family satisfaction survey for hospice, which benchmarks us against national, state, and local averages, and our own bereavement, palliative, volunteer, staff, and referral source satisfaction surveys.

Examples of Program Success

The best example of our program's success is our classification as both a Hospice Honors Recipient and a Hospice Honors Elite recipient. Both are based on our outcomes on the national satisfaction survey conducted with families of former hospice patients. To receive Hospice Honors, a hospice must perform above the national average on the majority of indicators. To receive Elite status, a hospice must perform above the national average on all indicators.

Plans & Policies
Organization has a Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has a Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 2
Date Strategic Plan Adopted Jan 2019
Management Succession Plan? No
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
External Assessments and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) - Home Care Accreditation2012
Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) - Home Care Accreditation2018
Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) - Home Care Accreditation2015
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) - Medicare Certification2018
Awards
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Hospice Honors EliteData Analytics2015
Hospice Honors StatusData Analytics2018
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the Government? Yes
Financials
Revenue vs Expenses - All Years
Expense Breakdown - Recent Year
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01, 2019
Fiscal Year End Dec 31, 2019
Projected Revenue $7,410,657.00
Projected Expenses $7,056,013.00
Endowment Value $17,677.00
Spending Policy N/A
Detailed Financials
Revenue and ExpensesHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201720162015
Total Revenue$7,313,083$7,697,785$7,124,771
Total Expenses$7,382,512$7,548,430$7,121,756
Revenue Less Expenses($69,429)$149,355$3,015
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available). Revenue from foundations and corporations may be included in individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201720162015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
------
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified----$0
Individual Contributions$199,119$228,899$268,457
----$1,784
$6,943,915$7,335,073$6,716,195
Investment Income, Net of Losses$2,316$837$1,672
Membership Dues----$0
Special Events$108,713$110,956$115,942
Revenue In-Kind----$0
Other$48,070$22,020$20,721
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201720162015
Program Expense$6,503,600$6,690,806$6,128,679
Administration Expense$726,690$684,661$809,479
Fundraising Expense$152,222$172,963$183,598
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.991.021.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses88%89%86%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue------
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201720162015
Total Assets$6,645,913$6,768,917$6,782,406
Current Assets$2,229,646$2,018,424$1,790,585
Long-Term Liabilities$1,544,044$1,707,540$1,872,841
Current Liabilities$531,894$423,687$422,085
Total Net Assets$4,569,975$4,637,690$4,487,480
Form 990s
2017 990
2016 HCP 990 2016
2015 Form 990
2014 Form 990
2013 990 2013
2012 Form 990
2011 Form 990
2010 990
2009 990
2008 990
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Dates Jan to Dec
Amount Raised To Date as of Jan
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
State Registration Yes
Address 208 Kidd Dr
Berea, KY 40403
Primary Phone 859 986-1500
Contact Email hospice@hospicecp.org
CEO/Executive Director Gail McGillis CEO
Board Chair Ms. Donna Angel
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Trust Bank