Christian Appalachian Project, Inc.
2528 Palumbo Drive
Lexington KY 40509
Contact Information
Nonprofit Christian Appalachian Project, Inc.
Address 2528 Palumbo Drive
Lexington, KY 40509
Phone (859) 2690635
Fax 859 2690617
Contact Name Dennis Jacobs
At A Glance
IRS Ruling Year 1966
Other ways to donate, support, or volunteer
Donations are always welcome either by phone (1-866-270-4227), mail (2610 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY, 40509), or online:  http://salsa.wiredforchange.com/o/5994/p/salsa/web/common/public/content?content_item_KEY=8845. Gifts may be undesignated or designated for a specific program or project.
 
Volunteering is highly encouraged and an important means of extending our reach to disadvantaged households in Appalachia.  Prospective volunteers may request a paper application by phone (800-755-3322), in writing (CAP Volunteer Program, 310 Beiting Lane, Mt. Vernon, KY 40456), or completing an application online:  http://christianapp.org/vol/.  Adults of all ages and chaperoned youth groups are welcome to volunteer.  Opportunities abound for several program areas, including short term, long term (one year+) and summer camp positions.
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses - All Years
Expense Breakdown - Recent Year
Statements
Mission Statement

Christian Appalachian Project's mission is Building Hope, Transforming Lives, and Sharing Christ's Love Through Service in Appalachia.

 Christian Appalachian Project is in its 51st year of helping people in need in Eastern Kentucky. Our community of care embraces all people in need. We operate 18 human services programs in 11 counties and our services extend across 15 states through the distribution of food and durable goods in our Operation Sharing Program.
 

Background Statement

Christian Appalachian Project (CAP) was founded in 1964 by Eastern Kentucky parish priest, Rev. Ralph Beiting, who felt called to minister to the full range of needs in his midst. For 50 years since, CAP has provided food, shelter, clothing, and a range of other vital services to people in need in Appalachia, with its primary target populations being children and low-income families, the elderly, and the disabled.

Through the efforts of approximately 150 full-time staff, 50 long-term volunteers, and 1,100 short-term volunteers annually, CAP’s direct service programs touch the lives of more than 80,000 people each year within its primary service area of Eastern Kentucky, home to the most concentrated generational poverty in America. CAP’s direct programs include housing repair, food and clothing banks, pre-school education, after-school programs, emergency assistance, domestic violence shelters, family counseling, summer camps, elderly services, disaster relief, and in-home respite services for families of individuals with disabilities.

Through its Operation Sharing® program, CAP also serves another 1 million people in need regionally, distributing $80 million in donated food and supplies each year among more than 1,000 partner nonprofits in 13 Appalachian states, plus Arkansas and Missouri. CAP’s basic mission is to help end poverty across Appalachia, a region which spans 205,000 square-miles from the New York Catskill Mountains to the Mississippi foothills and is home to 24.8 million Americans.

Impact Statement

Christian Appalachian Project (CAP) is in its 51st year of helping people in need in Eastern Kentucky. Our community of care embraces all people in need. We operate 18 human service programs in 11 counties and our services extend across 15 states through the distribution of food and durable goods in our Operation Sharing Program. With the help of 150 employees, 1,100 short and long term volunteers, and thanks to financial support of individual donors, foundations, and people who are concerned about the effects of poverty, CAP builds hope by decreasing the impact of poverty.


Some Highlights:
CAP's Family Advocacy program provides food, clothing, and furnishings in emergency situations. Our food pantry and thrift store annually serve 17,000 people. Professional counselors provide services to 1,000 low-income individuals. Up to 1,000 youth-- many from troubled homes or foster care-- attend CAP's summer camps. Students receive educational support through preschool and after-school programs. Through our housing repair program, CAP makes 250 homes safe, warm, and dry every year. Staff and volunteers provide disaster relief services and collaborate with bordering states in emergencies.
Needs Statement
As well as maintenance and capacity building in existing programs, Christian Appalachian Project is currently engaged in a capital campaign to achieve the following goals over the next three years:


1. Feeding the Hungry
The Need: People living below the poverty line in Rockcastle County often lack access to proper nutrition and consistent food supplies.
The Solution: Underwrite the operating costs of the Grateful Bread Food Pantry for three years to serve over 2,000 individuals and 800 families.
The Sharing: Many individuals who receive food volunteer in the food pantry and pass along the nutritional knowledge they learn to other family members.
2. Repairing Homes
The Need: Children, their families, the elderly, and individuals with disabilities often live in substandard housing, with unsafe plumbing, wiring, and inadequate protection from harsh winters. Nearly 500 substandard homes are on a waiting list, so many that we've had to stop taking applications.
The Solution: Providing the building materials that our staff and volunteers need to make homes Safe, Warm, and Dry.
The Sharing: If physically able, the clients participate in the home repair, learning valuable maintenance skills along the way.
3.Delivering Hope
The Need: Over 1,000 partner agencies, churches, schools, and other non-profits rely on CAP to supply household goods, furniture, clothes, food, and other commodities their clients use.
The Solution: Help CAP distribute goods to over 1.5 M people in Appalachia.
The Sharing: Many partner agencies share the resources we give them with smaller agencies in their community so they can spend less time raising funds and more time serving people in need.
4. Expanding Horizons
The Need: Children caught in the cycles of generational poverty often lack the guidance and motivation to become leaders who can one day improve their own families and communities.
The Solution: Underwriting summer camp scholarships and leadership training programs.
The Sharing: Families only pay $10 toward the cost of summer camp. Campers are encouraged to become camp volunteers as early as age 16 so they can be mentored to be leaders in their schools and communities.
CEO/Executive Director Statement

For 50 years, Christian Appalachian Project (CAP) has been helping people in need in Appalachia through a variety of non-evangelistic human service programs, and is today the largest human services charity indigenous to Appalachia. In all, CAP touches the lives of more than 1 million people in need every year.

Among CAP’s wide-ranging programs, one of the most notable is Operation Sharing®, which provides more than $80 million in donated goods annually to distressed communities in 15 Appalachian and Ozark states. Through a partnership with national gift-in-kind NGOs, CAP acquires these goods—including food and drinks, household and building supplies, clothing, appliances, furniture, office supplies, and books—from across the nation and then distributes them among more than 1,100 regional partner nonprofits.

Often using such supplies donated, another of CAP’s programs, its Housing Repair program, addresses the widespread problem of substandard housing conditions in Appalachia by providing minor repairs, extensive renovations, and in some cases completely new homes to low-income homeowners in some of the region’s poorest counties. In addition, the program provides participants with budgeting classes, home ownership classes, and assistance in obtaining low-interest loans when applicable.

With a focus on families and education, CAP also operates two Child and Family Development Centers in Eastern Kentucky which seek to break the cycle of poverty at its roots. At each of the Centers, educators work with children to instill basic skills and a firm learning foundation as well as helping to train and equip parents for the vital roles they play in the development of their children.

CAP offers many other programs that follow the common thread of helping those that are under-served and at-risk, including through disaster relief, elderly services, family counseling, domestic violence shelters, summer camps and in-school programs for children from low-income families, and in-home respite care for people with disabilities. Through participation from more than 1,200 short- and long-term volunteers annually, CAP’s large and well-established volunteer program also helps provide the backbone of labor and love necessary to operate and extend the impact of many of these programs.

Founded in 1964, CAP continues year after year to serve people in need in Appalachia, always looking for ways to both provide relief and to promote self-help so that participants, as often as possible, receive not just a handout but a hand-up on their paths out of poverty.

Board Chair Statement
Because of donor support we are able to build hope, transform lives, and share Christ's love through service in Appalachia. Your prayers and charitable support are not only sustaining our mission - they are sustaining  people in need because their lives matter to others. May God bless you.


Guy Adams
Service Categories
Secondary Organization Category Human Services / Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash)
Tertiary Organization Category Housing, Shelter / Housing Rehabilitation
Geographic Areas Served
Areas
In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Kentucky
Christian Appalachian Project is in its 51st year of helping people in need in Eastern Kentucky. Our community of care embraces all people in need. We operate 18 human services programs in 11 counties and our services extend across 15 states through the distribution of food and durable goods in our Operation Sharing Program.
Impact Questions
GoalsHelpWhat is the organization aiming to accomplish? This is the organization's ultimate goal for intended impact.
As well as maintenance and capacity building in existing programs, Christian Appalachian Project is currently engaged in a capital campaign to achieve the following goals over the next three years:
1. Feeding the Hungry
The Need: People living below the poverty line in Rockcastle County often lack access to proper nutrition and consistent food supplies.
The Solution: Underwrite the operating costs of the Grateful Bread Food Pantry for three years to serve over 2,000 individuals and 800 families.
The Sharing: Many individuals who receive food volunteer in the food pantry and pass along the nutritional knowledge they learn to other family members.
2. Repairing Homes
The Need: Children, their families, the elderly, and individuals with disabilities often live in substandard housing, with unsafe plumbing, wiring, and inadequate protection from harsh winters. Nearly 500 substandard homes are on a waiting list, so many that we've had to stop taking applications.
The Solution: Providing the building materials that our staff and volunteers need to make homes Safe, Warm, and Dry.
The Sharing: If physically able, the clients participate in the home repair, learning valuable maintenance skills along the way.
3.Delivering Hope
The Need: Over 1,000 partner agencies, churches, schools, and other non-profits rely on CAP to supply household goods, furniture, clothes, food, and other commodities their clients use.
The Solution: Help CAP distribute goods to over 1.5 M people in Appalachia.
The Sharing: Many partner agencies share the resources we give them with smaller agencies in their community so they can spend less time raising funds and more time serving people in need.
4. Expanding Horizons
The Need: Children caught in the cycles of generational poverty often lack the guidance and motivation to become leaders who can one day improve their own families and communities.
The Solution: Underwriting summer camp scholarships and leadership training programs.
The Sharing: Families only pay $10 toward the cost of summer camp. Campers are encouraged to become camp volunteers as early as age 16 so they can be mentored to be leaders in their schools and communities.

 

StrategiesHelpWhat are the organization's strategies for its stated long-term goals?
CAP will continue to pursue our mission of building hope, transforming lives, and sharing Christ’s love through service in Appalachia. To achieve this, CAP has engaged a strategic plan with four aspiration statements. These are:


• To serve and transform individuals, families, and communities through compassionate programming that utilizes a self-help philosophy and emphasizes uplifting young people.
• To expand our impact in Appalachia through the leveraging of resources and partnerships.
• To articulate, in a compelling way, the impact of our work so that more constituents are inspired to be supportive.
• To sustain and grow our capacity to serve by operating efficiently, utilizing effective technologies, ensuring fiscal responsibility, and providing staff and volunteers with innovative leadership development opportunities.
CapabilitiesHelpWhat are the organization’s capabilities for doing this? What resources, capacities, and connections support its progress towards long-term goals?
1. Gift-in-kind receipt and distribution - Distribution network across 13 Appalachian states, Missouri, and Arkansas.


2. Human Services Program Management- intake, evaluation of need versus resources, service delivery, and outcomes measurement.
3. Volunteer Program - Create and maintain an extensive network to recruit volunteers, provide housing and training in a positive volunteer experience while maximizing benefits to program participants.
4. Funds Management - Skillful stewardship of resources toward maximum impact in reducing the challenges brought on by poverty.
IndicatorsHelpHow will the organization know if it is making progress? What are the key qualitative and quantitative indicators against which the organization assesses its progress toward its intended impact? We have separate indicators of progress appropriate to each of our different human services programs and Operation Sharing. CAP is currently engaged in outcomes measurement across our organization to help us identify new approaches, goals, and strategies to address the most pressing needs of our participants in Appalachia.
ProgressHelpWhat has and hasn’t been accomplished so far? We have separate indicators of progress appropriate to each of our different human services programs and Operation Sharing. CAP is currently engaged in outcomes measurement across our organization to help us identify new approaches, goals, and strategies to address the most pressing needs of our participants in Appalachia.

 

Board Chair
Board Chair Kevin Doyle
Company Affiliation Congleton-Hacker Co.
Term Aug 2014 to Aug 2016
Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Guy Adams President/CEO, Christian Appalachian ProjectVoting
Katheryn Baird Community VolunteerVoting
Nancy Horn Barker PharmacistVoting
Mark Barrens Owner, Halmar CorporationVoting
Jackie Collier Director of Alumni Relations, Eastern Kentucky UniversityVoting
Joyce Taylor Cummins First Southern National BankVoting
Dennis Dorton Retired Banker, Citzens National BankVoting
Kevin Doyle CFO, Congleton-Hacker Co.Voting
Shanna Elliott Community VolunteerVoting
Bob Gound Wal-Mart
Frank P. Heaberlin AttorneyVoting
Bob Hutchison Business Owner, McDonalds RestaurantVoting
Holly James Georgetown College
Rob Lawson Thrivent Financial
Jon Lett Griffith DeLaney Hillman & Company
Haley McCoy Youth Services Director/Energy Advisor, Jackson Energy CooperativeVoting
Marty Preston Business Partner, Benchmark, Ark-La-Tex Financial Services, LLCVoting
Chris Tackett Business Owner, Unisign CorporationVoting
Judge B. Wilson IIGeneral Counsel for Berea CollegeVoting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 18
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 13
Female 6
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits 10
Board Meeting Attendance % 70%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 4
Board Co-Chair
Board CoChair Shanna Elliott
Standing Committees
Audit
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Finance
Personnel
Program / Program Planning
Additional Board Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Guy Adams President/CEO, Christian Appalachian Project
Marc & Laurie Cobane VP of Investments, UBS Financial Services
Mark Gooch President/CEO, Community Trust Bank
Dave & Josa Harl Owners, Pinnacle Productions
Jeni & Patrick Huff Owner, 0424 Inc.
Mark Jacobsen CEO, NetGain Technologies
Diana Juhlin
Mike Neal CEO, Reed Brothers Insurance Group
Heather Spurlock
Troy & Bobbie Turner President/CEO, Commonwealth Technology
Judge Wilson IIGeneral Counsel, Berea College; Attory, Wyatt Tarrant & Combs LLP
Comments
CEO Comments

Christian Appalachian Project (CAP) has a Board of Directors that is a self-perpetuating body with terms of one year, renewable a maximum of 10 consecutive years. Board bylaws require at least three and no more than 25 members. The Board meets quarterly, and all meetings are documented and recorded in minutes. The Board annually elects a Chairperson. The Board has committees that cover all aspects of the organization, including Development, Audit, Finance, Personnel, Property, Governance, and Executive. The entire Board receives general information regarding the financial status of the organization monthly.

CEO/Executive Director
Executive Director Mr. Guy Adams
Term Start Feb 2010
Email gadams@chrisapp.org
Experience

Through his professional career as a consultant, fundraiser, vice president for a private college, and numerous other positions, Guy Adams brings expertise in nonprofit best practices and organizational leadership. His experiences include building comprehensive development programs, campaign planning and execution, board development and training, donor research, cultivation and solicitation, major gifts and Moves Management®, estate planning, endowment building, grant-writing, donor acknowledgement and stewardship, annual giving, strategic planning, and volunteer utilization.

Guy Adams arrived at Christian Appalachian Project with a mandate to enhance the organization's philanthropic support through a significant effort toward developing its planned and major gift program into a best-practice leader. To that end, he has helped create, update, and implement the organization’s first strategic plan as well as embarked on several strategies to increase donations and strengthen donor relationships.

Co-CEO
Co-CEO Phyllis Caudill
Email pcaudill@chrisapp.org
Experience Phyllis brings excellent credentials as a long time manager with Christian Appalachian Project, previously charged with management of the direct mail program started by our founder before incorporation.
Staff
Full Time Staff 142
Part Time Staff 0
Volunteers 1200
Contractors 5
Retention Rate 92%
Management Reports to Board? Yes
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 6
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 134
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 1
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 42
Female 100
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs
NameTerm
Bill Mills Mar 2002 - Feb 2009
Senior Staff
Title Vice President of Administration
Experience/Biography

Randy Beckham began his career at the Christian Appalachian Project in 2006 as a long-term volunteer doing special project work for the president. In 2008, he joined CAP as a full-time development officer.  Before joining CAP, he was president and C.E.O. of a community bank.

Title Controller/Treasurer
Title Director of Human Resources/Corporate Secretary
Experience/Biography

Gloria Jordan originally joined the Christian Appalachian Project as a Medical Coordinator for the Children's Special Needs Home. Since then, her role has been mostly managerial, and she's worked with such diverse programs as:

  • Parents Are Teachers
  • Rainbow Respite Care Center
  • The Hisel Child Development Center

·      

Title Vice President of Human Services
Experience/Biography

Anita Seals first came to the Christian Appalachian Project in 1981 after a short volunteer service.  She worked at the Spouse Abuse Center doing various administrative roles until 1998 when she became the Assistant Director of Human Services.  In 2005 she advanced to the Regional Director of Human Services and 2012 became the Vice President of Human Services.

Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
NonManagement Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Comments
CEO Comments

Christian Appalachian Project practices an open and transparent form of management, providing whatever information is asked of it whether by watchdog agencies, state governments, or any regulatory agency. Likewise, CAP is open with its employees and volunteers with the executive leadership generally holding at least two town hall meetings at various sites throughout the organization annually. In addition, the president/CEO distributes a monthly report to all Board members, employees, and volunteers each month that includes detailed financial information so that everyone has access to information concerning key operations of the organization, along with the organization's most currently available financial information. Finally, the organization has an active strategic plan, which is reviewed monthly by senior leaders within the organization and several other employees throughout the organization to help insure positive action and accountability and ultimately by the Board of Directors, which receives an update on the plan quarterly.

Description
CAP’s widest-ranging program is Operating Sharing®. When the program began 28 years ago, the goal was to provide a bridge to Appalachian households in economic distress by donating basic commodities (food, books, furniture, and building and cleaning supplies). The program has grown into a major collaboration, among CAP, national charities (Operation Compassion, Gifts-in-Kind America, and Feed the Children), and over 1,200 grassroots pantries, churches, schools, and human service agencies. 


With the help of CAP’s three 18-wheel tractor-trailers and its affiliation with the DMA Nonprofit Federation, Operation Sharing® continues to have an impact. Non-cash (in-kind) donations are shipped to one of the Federation’s eight warehouse hubs nationwide. Next, CAP sends an 18-wheel tractor-trailer to transport the donated commodities from a hub to one of its three warehouses. Employees and volunteers sort shipments and send notifications to local nonprofit partners, detailing what’s available and scheduling pick-up deliveries or transports to nonprofit partners.
Operation Sharing®, maintains detailed documentation on all commodities acquired, including number, weight and monetary value of transports by item and in aggregate. When the donations are shipped out or picked up by our partner charities, the food/supplies are also counted, weighed, and priced on the date they are distributed. CAP’s accounting records are tested and validated by a public accounting firm which performs an annual audit (see attached). In FY 2014, CAP distributed $53.7 M in food and goods to 1.5 million people in 15 states. The total contribution over 29 years of the program is $1.5 Billion +.
Budget 1801954
Category Human Services, General/Other Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent, Children and Youth (0 - 19 years), Families
Program Short Term Success Short-term, Operation Sharing is able to provide instant relief for families in need of various items and supplies such as food, hygienic materials, and toys for children. This increase their confidence and quality of life.
Program Long term Success Operation Sharing is capable of increasing the capacity to serve for hundreds of non-profits throughout Appalachia as well as increasing the response time of disaster relief programs by having supplies on-hand.
Program Success Monitored By The Christian Appalachian Project keeps detailed documentation of which non-profits it distributes to and how often it does so as well as how many participants these nonprofits serve.
Examples of Program Success Operation Sharing was able to provide two truckloads of disaster relief supplies to victims of Superstorm Sandy in West Virginia in November 2012.
Description
Substandard housing conditions, which are 3-4 times more prevalent in the region than nationally hinder the development of children and the mobility of older people in Eastern Kentucky. Such conditions are detrimental to the health and safety of everyone involved. Many low-income households have to choose between the smallest of repairs and buying food, gas, utilities, medicine, and other essentials. Upkeep and maintenance cost are prohibitive. Those with urgent repair needs that they cannot complete, due to age, finances, or disability, are extremely vulnerable.


CAP’s Housing Repair program exists to help alleviate burdens due to inadequate or unsafe housing conditions. Our goal is to assure that all people living in our service area have homes that are safe, warm, and dry. While CAP completes an average of 260 home repair projects annually, at least 300 eligible homeowners remain on the program’s waiting list at any given time, evidence of just how much need persists in the communities we serve. Whenever resources allow, we work to expand our numbers and extend our service.
While other organizations do good work in housing repair, CAP is uniquely positioned for maximum impact for five reasons: (1) a large, well-established, and well-organized volunteer program, (2) the ability to secure donated supplies amounting to approximately 20 percent of building supply needs, (3) a complementary slate of human service programs to meet the broader needs of residents, and (4) a 50-year presence as a trusted “good neighbor” to people in need in Eastern Kentucky.
Budget 1745151
Category Housing, General/Other Home Repair Programs
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent, Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens, Families
Program Short Term Success Short-term, New Hope helps put a roof over some participants' heads and makes others (the elderly) more mobile. Participants see results as soon as a repair, renovation, or rebuilding project is completed.
Program Long term Success Long-term, New Hope will provide participants with structurally sound residences for years to come, help decrease heating and cooling costs through weatherization, make residents more mobile through the building of ramps, and make participants feel safer and more secure in their homes.
Program Success Monitored By The Christian Appalachian Project keeps detailed records of who it helps, the cost, and the length of time. This allows it to budget for projects and leverage connections that help them get reduced or free building supplies. This also allows the organization to do continual follow-ups and evaluations with participants and ensure that they've received a long-lasting, high-quality repair project.
Examples of Program Success Every year, New Hope completes over 250 projects for economically disadvantaged, elderly, and disabled participants.
Description

CAP operates two Child and Family Development Centers located in McCreary and Rockcastle counties in Eastern Kentucky. Focusing particularly on at-risk children and youth, each Center provides services tailored to meet the particular needs of the surrounding community, including daycare, preschool, family literacy, home visitation for infants and toddlers, as well as after-school programming for school-age children and teens.

Budget 830133
Category Human Services, General/Other Family-Based Services
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years), Families, Females
Program Short Term Success Short term, the centers are able to graduate 100% of all students onto kindergarten, and they help decrease or eliminate issues caused by developmental delays in 100% of applicable students.
Program Long term Success The Child and Development Centers help prepare students for kindergarten and higher, give low-income students access to the best educational opportunities in the area, help decrease or eliminate issues caused by developmental delays, and give students access to positive mentors.  All of this will allow them to become capable students and productive, well-educated members of society.
Program Success Monitored By The centers work with local therapists to chart and track the progress of students and fulfill the standards of both the state and local educational institutes.
Examples of Program Success One program, Parents Are Teachers, works with students with developmental delays or who are risk to develop them.  The current teacher, Suzann Fenton, works with 18 students annually aged 3 and 4, and is able to prepare them to either join the Christian Appalachian Project's preschool or to move onto public or private preschools.
Description The Family Advocacy program provides short-term emergency assistance to people in need of food, utility assistance, shelter, medical supplies, household goods, and clothing. The program works closely with community-based organizations and other CAP programs to support each family’s long-term growth and particular goals. Self-help strategies are encouraged to preserve the dignity of each family. The Family Advocacy program also coordinates four major campaigns each year: the Christmas Basket Program, School Readiness Backpack Program, Small Farms and Gardens, and Women’s Retreat.
Budget 254459
Category Human Services, General/Other Emergency Assistance
Population Served Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated, Females,
Program Short Term Success Short-term, Family Advocacy provides once-a-year emergency assistance, often to families who have experienced burn-outs.  This assistance is usually financial and helps cover rent, utilities, transportation, and medical expenses.
Program Long term Success Long term, the Family Advocacy programs aims to strengthen the family unit and provide short-term assistance to them that will allow them to gather their resources and develop new coping and budgeting strategies.
Program Success Monitored By The Christian Appalachian Project keeps detailed records of each family and participant helped, when they were helped, and how they were helped.  This prevents repeat assistance throughout the year and allows the organization to better understand the participants and their particular problems.
Examples of Program Success Currently, the Family Advocacy program in McCreary County is helping families develop payment plans for their home heating and cooling costs.  This has become especially important as cuts to LIHEAP have prevented dozens of families from meeting their monthly heating bills.
Description Licensed counselors with advanced degrees care for the emotional, psychological, and spiritual needs of individuals, families, and groups. Areas of focus range from abuse and trauma to behavior problems and family issues. No one is turned away due to inability to pay.
Budget 124556
Category Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Family Violence Counseling
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent, Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated, Families
Program Short Term Success Short-term, the Counseling programs will help participants function in their daily lives and work towards feeling safer and more control.
Program Long term Success The Counseling program aims to ultimately strengthen families, reduce domestic violence in eastern Kentucky, and ensure that Appalachian Kentuckians have access to afford mental health care.
Program Success Monitored By The Counseling program takes extensive notes of each session and follows up continually.  It also collaborates with local physical and mental health agencies to ensure that local participants are receiving the best care possible.
Examples of Program Success From March 2012 to March 2013, the Counseling program has been working with people from Magoffin, Martin, Morgan, and Johnson counties who experienced the devastating tornadoes in March 2012.  Thanks to a generous grant from Americares, therapists were able to provide 250 people with in-home counseling sessions.
Program Comments
CEO Comments

 

 

Christian Appalachian Project (CAP) is in its 51st year of helping people in need in Eastern Kentucky. Our community of care embraces all people in need. We operate 18 human services programs in 12 counties and our services extend across 15 states through the distribution of food and durable goods in our Operation Sharing Program. With the help of 150 employees and 1,100 short and long term volunteers and thanks to the financial support of individual donors, foundations, and people who are concerned about the effects of poverty, CAP builds hope by decreasing the impact of poverty.

 

We have only outlined some of our programs here. For a full description of all programs go to christianapp.org.
Some Highlights:
CAP's Family Advocacy program provides food, clothing, and furnishings, in emergency situations. Our food pantry and thrift store annually serve 17,000 people. Professional counselors provide services to 1,000 low income individuals. Up to 1,000 youth-- many from foster care or troubled homes-- attend CAP's summer camps. Students receive educational support through preschool and after-school programs. Through our housing repair program, CAP makes 250 homes safe, warm, and dry every year. Staff and volunteers provide disaster relief services and collaborate with bordering states in emergencies.
Plans & Policies
Organization has a Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has a Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Date Strategic Plan Adopted Feb 2012
Management Succession Plan? No
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Collaborations
CAP partners with 1,100 nonprofits across Appalachia and the Ozarks through its Operation Sharing® program, which distributes more than $80 million in donated goods among these partner nonprofits each year.
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Rotary Club of Lexington2009
Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization1985
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)1976
External Assessments and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)2001
Awards
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Outstanding Philanthropic Organization of the YearNational Association of Fund Raising Executives1993
Journalism Award - 1ast Place - Best Article - Mountain Spirit MagazineCatholic Press Association1995
Nonprofit Organization of the YearDMA Non Profit Council1997
Mailing Excellence Award - Judges Choice SelectionNational Postal Forum1999
Father George Mader Award to Rev. Msgr. Ralph Beiting (President)Catholic Network of Volunteer Service2000
Governor's Citation - Outstanding Services to KentuckyCabinet for Health & Family Services2005
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the Government? Yes
Financials
Revenue vs Expenses - All Years
Expense Breakdown - Recent Year
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start Sept 01, 2015
Fiscal Year End Aug 31, 2016
Projected Revenue $86,234,513.00
Projected Expenses $85,994,181.00
Endowment Value $1,508,341.00
Spending Policy Income plus capital appreciation
Detailed Financials
Revenue and ExpensesHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Revenue$84,733,091$80,550,894$108,859,463
Total Expenses$82,584,110$79,081,338$106,863,611
Revenue Less Expenses$2,148,981$1,469,556$1,995,852
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available). Revenue from foundations and corporations may be included in individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
------
Government Contributions$999,770$986,802$1,014,117
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$999,770$986,802$1,014,117
Individual Contributions$82,102,980$76,968,127$105,171,229
--$0--
$854,178$1,761,569$1,843,402
Investment Income, Net of Losses$328,570$413,144$458,585
Membership Dues--$0--
Special Events--$0--
Revenue In-Kind--$54,338,050--
Other$447,593$421,252$372,070
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$69,531,525$66,040,799$94,736,819
Administration Expense$4,400,120$4,144,017$4,318,918
Fundraising Expense$8,652,465$8,896,522$7,807,924
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.031.021.02
Program Expense/Total Expenses84%84%89%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue10%11%7%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$30,820,604$29,150,197$26,970,060
Current Assets$4,991,933$5,762,428$5,184,552
Long-Term Liabilities$3,308,870$2,834,770$3,068,406
Current Liabilities$1,870,215$2,143,558$1,062,627
Total Net Assets$25,641,519$24,171,869$22,299,027
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Campaign Purpose Last year, CAP embarked on the first steps of a capital campaign concentrating in four critical areas: • Home Blitz 1,190 To repair 1,190 homes through this initiative, making them safe, warm, and dry. • Project Leadership for Appalachian Youth To implement supplemental in-school activities and an expanded year-round curriculum • Loaves and Fishes Underwrite the cost of the food pantry for one year. • Delivering Hope Expand distribution of household goods, building supplies, furniture, clothes, food, and other commodities.
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
State Registration Yes
Comments
CEO Comments
Three out of the last four years, CAP's total revenues outpaced expenses. The challenge ahead will be sustainability at our current level of operation as fundraising revenues for human service organizations as a whole have lost ground nationally against rising costs. We must find a way to either increase income or lower expenses, or both, at a time when great uncertainties remain regarding federal spending as well as personal and corporate taxation.

Currently, CAP is reaching new donors with new fundraising channels and technologies. In the coming months we will be testing Direct Response TV with the hope that we can acquire new monthly donors with less upfront cost than current direct response approaches. CAP is also continuing to increase organizational efficiencies through gains in training, experience, and stewardship.

Address 2528 Palumbo Drive
Lexington, KY 40509
Primary Phone 859 2690635
Contact Email djacobs@chrisapp.org
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Guy Adams
Board Chair Kevin Doyle
Board Chair Company Affiliation Congleton-Hacker Co.