SOUTH CENTRAL KENTUCKY KIDS ON THE BLOCK INC
958 Collett Avenue
Bowling Green KY 42101
Contact Information
Nonprofit SOUTH CENTRAL KENTUCKY KIDS ON THE BLOCK INC
Address 958 Collett Avenue
Bowling Green, KY 42101
Phone (270) 842-2259
Contact Name Ashley Reynolds
Web and Social Media
Stephen tries to explain what child abuse is to Nam.
At A Glance
Former Names
Bowling Green, Kentucky Kids on the Block, Inc.
Other ways to donate, support, or volunteer You may also donate by mailing a check, in-kind donations -see wish list on website, or volunteer at our fundraisers, or assist at the office.
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses - All Years
Expense Breakdown - Recent Year
Statements
Mission Statement The mission of South Central Kentucky Kids on the Block, Inc. is to provide ongoing education and prevention through Bunraku-style puppetry to children in grades K-6 and to the community at large, regarding handicap awareness, safety, medical conditions and social concerns. The aims of the program are: to foster the development of a better understanding and acceptance of differences in others; to encourage appropriate and positive decision making in difficult social situations; and to provide exposure to the ancient art form of puppet theater and the creative expression that comes through puppetry.
Background Statement
The  Kids on the Block, Inc. originated in 1977 as a direct response to U.S. Public Law 94-142 which required all children be educated in the least restrictive environment. For many children with challenges that meant being educated along with their non-challenged peers. Mark Riley, who represents a child with Cerebral Palsy, was the first puppet character created to fill the need of physically challenged children to help their peers understand and accept them. Through Mark Riley, the children began asking questions directly to Mark about his differences. The Kids on the Block, Inc. was launched because of this enthusiastic response from children.
 
The Kids on the Block, now internationally acclaimed, has continued to grow over the years. There are now many, many puppets and 44 different programs for Kids on the Block troupes to choose from. We have chosen 22 of these programs to perform for children in the state of Kentucky.There are troupes in over 30 countries and at least on in every state in the U.S. We are the only troupe in the state of Kentucky. 
Impact Statement
Our accomplishments over the past year include:
  • Request for services has grown statewide. We serve about 20,000 children in over 15 counties in Kentucky each year.
  • Managed to remain financially stable in this down economy by analyzing our budget  and cutting expenses to a bare minimum.
  • Employed a caring and dedicated staff which has become more involved in other organizations within the community such as Chamber of Commerce activities, Kiwanis Club, Jr. Woman's Club, etc.
  • Kids on the Block started a new fundraiser called "Scotty's Pound the Pavement for Kids." This is a free run for kids. All proceeds from this run is used to provide programs free of charge to schools in Warren County. 

 

Our goals for the current year are:
  • Secure funding for programs outside the Bowling Green and Warren County area to other parts of the state, especially those areas that have not previously had programs or had them in the recent past.
  • Find an endowment fund volunteer with the right passion, personality, and time for that position.
  • Find a donor and begin a Health Reimbursement Plan for our employees.
  • Priortize building needs, develop a construction plan, begin  remodeling or repair projects. 
  • Hire and maintain a stable puppeteer staff in order to minimize training time and costs.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Needs Statement
The most pressing needs for Kids on the Block are:
  • Secure funding for programs and equipment replacement. We estimate that it cost $200 plus millage to produce a program when considering staff training salaries, cost of vehicle, performance equipment and office expenditures.
  • Secure funds and volunteers to repair and remodel portions of our building, i.e. flooring, kitchen area, insulation, and HVAC system.
  • Secure an endowment volunteer to grow our endowment fund.
  • Secure funding to attend KOB conferences and trainings on the national and regional level.
  • Begin a health reimbursement plan for our employees.
CEO/Executive Director Statement

Kids on the Block provide a unique way to teach children using a form of puppetry called Bunraku. Our puppeteers dress in all black from head to toe and become the shadow of the puppet. The puppeteers are soon forgotten as the child-sized puppets seem to come alive. This style of puppetry and a dose of humor are
extremely effective in creating an atmosphere where the children feel comfortable asking the puppets questions about the topic. 

All programs are developed and copyrighted by the National Kids on the Block organization. Their
research staff works closely with sponsoring organizations to gather information that is used to develop the scripts. Once a script is developed, KOB researchers field-test the program and the questions most frequently asked by the children are noted. Answers to the questions are gathered and follow-up activities are developed which can be distributed by the KOB troupe to reinforce the program’s message and continue the learning in the
classroom after a program. All KOB staff is trained in what the children will or will not ask. Any questions they cannot answer for children during a program, they will refer to the children’s parents or guidance counselor.
Kids on the Block programs have been well received by teachers, administrators, parents and children. Puppeteers “bring to life the kids” in their communities, giving children the opportunity to have direct interaction with the puppet characters who openly discuss their challenges and differences and help bring a solution to their problems.

The joy that we feel knowing that our hard work has helped a child disclose their abuse, or help children understand the differences of their peers and accept them or teach them to be safe when reacting to a
bullying situation is very hard to explain. But we leave our office and go home every evening knowing we have made a difference.

Board Chair Statement

South Central Kentucky Kids on the Block is truly a success story from the very beginning and celebrated their 25thbirthday in 2010. The organization was started by a group of all volunteer ladies with a passion for helping children with physical challenges, medical conditions, or social issues to understand and be understood when interacting with their peers. As the organization grew, the requirements placed on the puppeteers became too much for the volunteers, so it first became necessary to hire puppeteers. Then, after several years the volunteer director decided it was time to hand that position over to a paid staff member. However, the deep roots established by these ladies have served the organization well and it has continued to grow more than most might ever have imagined. They truly planted the seed and saw that the organization took roots before handing it over to others. Throughout the years,the many dedicated board members and executive directors have always truly believed in the mission of Kids on the Block and it has therefore maintained a prominent position among the non-profits in our area. A few years ago, we began to think more globally and decided to extend our programs statewide. Since there is really no other act out there that does what we do and we have such a unique way of teaching children; we did not want to limit ourselves to just local performances.

Kids on the Block certainly has a filled a niche with the issues addressed and the manner in which they address them. The humor and candor they use to capture the attention of their audiences causes the participants to laugh while teaching them the skills needed to make healthy decision that will serve them their entire lives. This is the reason I have chosen to be involved with this wonderful organization.

Service Categories
Secondary Organization Category Youth Development / Single Organization Support
Tertiary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Arts & Culture
Geographic Areas Served
Areas
Kentucky
Kids on the Block serves all towns, neighborhoods and zip codes; wherever we have funding throughout the state of Kentucky.
Board Chair
Board Chair Mrs Johna Rodgers
Company Affiliation GREC
Term Jan 2012 to Dec 2014
Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Mrs. Amanda Blakeman Bell, Ore, Ayers, and Moore, P.S.C.Voting
Mr Jordan Blann Northwest MutualVoting
Mr. Keith Coffman Owner of Lost River Pizza Co.Voting
Mrs. Shelly Compton Carr, Riggs & Ingram, CPAS
Mr. Alan Cooper WDNS/WKCT RadioVoting
Mrs. Allison Edwards Belle Mariee Bridal BoutiqueVoting
Ms. Amber Elliott Franklin Bank & TrustVoting
Mr. Dan Harbison Farmers National BankVoting
Mrs. Heather Hawkins Hancock BankVoting
Mrs. Lindsay Hinton Reynolds,Johnston, Hinton, & Pepper Law FirmVoting
Ms. Alice Kummer Kids on the Block Co-FounderNonVoting
Mrs. Lauren Kummer Warren County SchoolsVoting
Mr. Mike Law Scotty's Contracting & StoneVoting
Mrs. Shelley Lowe Bowling Green Municipal UtilitiesVoting
Ms. Kellie McKay Commonwealth BroadcastingVoting
Mrs. Kim Mitchell CHC dba Center Care
Ms. Ashley Reynolds Kids on the Block DirectorNonVoting
Mrs. Johna Rodgers Green River Regional Coop.Voting
Mrs. Amanda Shaff Kentucky Farm CreditVoting
Mr. Brandon Shirley BKD, LLP Audit DirectorVoting
Mr. David Smith Citizens First BankVoting
Mr. Steve Sutton Chase BankVoting
Mrs. Leslie Turci LifeSkills CCSUVoting
Mr. Barry Williams Commonwealth BroadcastingVoting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 23
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 9
Female 14
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria? No
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 75%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 98%
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 12
Board Co-Chair
Board CoChair Mrs. Kim Mitchell
Company Affiliation CHC dba Center Care
Term 2013 to 2014
Youth Board Members
Additional Boards: Youth Board Members
NameAffiliation
Caroline Cohron Jr. Board Member
Cole Compton Jr. Board Member
Heath Crosby Jr. Board Member
Hailey Daniel Jr. Board Member
Hailey Emberton Jr. Board Member
Ella Farley Jr. Board Member
Becca Geron Jr. Board Member
Bailey Poole Jr. Board Member
Emma Simpson Jr. Board Member
Blake Suiters Jr. Board Member
Standing Committees
Executive
Finance
Personnel
Endowment
Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Comments
CEO Comments
We are fortunate to have the opportunity to reach so many children and impact their lives in any number of ways. Offering programs on 22 different topics gives us the chance to teach children skills they will be able to use their entire lives. This is a tremendous opportunity as well as a growing challenge. KOB has been very blessed to have true friends and dedicated, caring board members to guide our work and our direction over the past 25 years. Their leadership has created a culture of success and provided policies that caused us to define our expectations and verify our performance. The consistent management, cohesive policies and procedures and the right decisions for our area of responsibility within the community has served us well.
 
CEO/Executive Director
Executive Director Ms. Ashley Reynolds
Term Start Dec 2012
Email ashleykob@yahoo.com
Staff
Full Time Staff 3
Part Time Staff 2
Volunteers 217
Contractors 0
Retention Rate 60%
Management Reports to Board? Yes
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 5
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 5
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs
NameTerm
Lisa Llewellyn Feb 2001 - Mar 2002
Davida Warren Mar 2002 - Dec 2004
Senior Staff
Title Program Coordinator/Lead Puppeteer
Experience/Biography
Mrs. Guerra graduated from Western Kentucky University in 2010 with a Bachelor's Degree in Child and Families Studies. She has worked at Kids on the Block as a puppeteer since 2011. In 2013 she began scheduling Kids on the Block Programs as the Program Coordinator and became the Lead Puppeteer in 2014. 
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
NonManagement Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Comments
CEO Comments
1. We have had the same energetic executive director since 2004 which has created the stability we needed to push our mission and helped create the strategic planning that has increased our presence around the state.

Our number one funding objective is always for programs.That is what we are all about. If we did not do programs there would be no need for us to exist. So our first objective is always to find funds to take our programs throughout the state and to purchase or replace and maintain our performance equipment. We have hired a development director to help with funding for programs outside our local area.

Another challenge we face is maintaining a stable puppeteer staff due to the fact that we are not able to offer benefits. It is hard to find staff that does not need access to group medical insurance and we are currently not able to offer that. The vast majority of our staff changes are due to the fact that they leave for a job that offers benefits. We are exploring ways to fund a health reimbursement account as a partial solution to that problem.
2. I have been an active member of the KOB Board for 13 years. I have served as their Secretary, Publicity Committee Chair, StrategicPlanning Chair, Chairman of the Board and Past-Chair. 

I have seen many successes over the years...children have been taught the courage to disclose abuse, how to deal with bullies, and how to handle life issues, and to accept differences in other children. 

The challenges facing KOB are limitations on funding and community awareness. KOB is a pro-active organization. For example, we teach kids how and why not to do drugs, with the hope of preventing the start of such abuse. KOB has wonderful business community support. However, our organization is not as well known as it can be throughout the community and individuals. To bring awareness takes advertisement which takes funding.   

These challenges have become more apparent with the downturn in the economy. Businesses andindividuals have not been able to give like they could. This has hurt. This organization has to cut programs when funding is cut. The organization has tried to continue raising money through our fundraisers, grants and donations. 

For me, there is no greater success than saving a child from abuse. Kids on the Block has seen this success first hand. Kids on the Block’s entire purpose is to educate children which is why I continue to humbly serve this organization. 

Description
Our physical challenges and medical conditions programs address disability awareness issues that have been thoroughly researched and developed to help teach children acceptance. These programs focus on educating youth about various conditions while emphasizing acceptance and understanding of all people and how to celebrate the differences that are present in all of us.
 
Often, children with disabilities, whether visible or not, have difficulty socially connecting with their peers. Our performances help to breakdown their peers' sense of confusion, misunderstanding and stereotypes that may place a barrier between social acceptance and friendship.
 
Our"Kids" explain that differences make each of us unique. These scripts present important messages of acceptance and understanding of physical disabilities, educational differences and medical conditions. Programs include: Cerebral Palsy, Spina Bifida, Combating Childhood Obesity, Cancer, Diabetes Autism, Visual Impairment and Children's Mental Health.
Budget 450.
Category
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years), Other Health/Disability,
Program Short Term Success
On the three quantative measures for evaluating our programs we usually have better than average results. For example on the Teacher Report Card we average 3.5 or better out of a 4 point scale on all programs. For programs measured by the key phrase instruments the average learning that takes place is around 37 percent. For the programs where we use the student pre/post test our average gain is 10-11 per cent. Although, this number is lower than we would like, we still feel there is a fair amount of learning that is taking place.
Program Long term Success

Over the last two decades, numerous studies have been conducted to determine how effectively the Kids on the Block educational system achieves its goals of educating young audiences about differences, disabilities, social, and safety issues. The studies range from informal questionnaires and evaluations to formal research studies conducted by trained researchers. The results have been positive and attest to the effectiveness of KOB’s unique education presentation.

One such study concluded that KOB programs were a successful method for instilling positive attitudes, toward the handicapped in non-handicapped students. Students receiving the KOB program differed significantly in attitude change scores from the students who did not. This was interpreted to mean that the intervention positively affected attitudes toward the handicapped. moreover the positive results obtained imply the effectiveness of KOB programs and reinforce the efficacy of some of the intervention strategies incorporated by KOB.

 

Program Success Monitored By

Evaluation instruments include four different measures that both qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate our success. They include:

  • Teacher“report cards”: Teachers complete this survey instrument indicating satisfaction from an educator's point of view; using a 4 point scale. This is used for all school performances.
  • Pre/Post test: This test confidentially measures each child’s knowledge before and after the program. Developed by educators, this quick 10-question test includes forms for varied reading and comprehension levels. Used for selected programs.
  • KeyPhrase Tool: Student letters and pictures sent to our "Kids" are examined for certain phrases that indicate learning. This tool was developed by researchers and the national KOB office and is used for selected programs.
  • Puppeteer observations and debriefing: Following each performance, puppeteers discuss the conversations they had with children, teachers, and counselors. They note the level of interaction with students during the performance and the Question and Answer session. They debrief on ways to improve the performance and or interaction.
Examples of Program Success

8-8-11 - Email from the Guidance Counselor, Rich Pond Elementary, Bowling Green, KY

I am back at school and planning for my lessons for the year. Of course, one of the first classes I want to get plugged in will be KOB as my students LOVE, LOVE, LOVE the KOB:)  I am so hopeful that KOB will be able to join us again this year as it is the highlight of my students year:)

 

Description
These programs focus on building a positive self-image by addressing body image, social interaction, and family relationships. The purpose of these programs is to provide children accurate information in a sensitive manner to foster the skills necessary to deal with issues affecting their self-esteem and well-being.
 
There is often a social void between children with social problems and their typically developing peers. Research says that children begin to make social comparisons between the ages of seven and nine years of age. It is natural for them to have questions about differences they see between themselves and their classmates. These age-appropriate skits help kids with decision making and refusal skills. These peer-to-peer interactions model self-expression, understading, and the confidence that comes with acquiring knowledge.
 
This group of programs includes: Problem Solving, Child Abuse I, Child Abuse II, Multiculturalism, Divorce, Bereavement, Self-Esteem, and Substance Abuse.
Budget 450.
Category
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years), Families, At-Risk Populations
Program Long term Success
The National Kids on the Block organization has provided studies showing the effectiveness of the Kids on the Block educational puppet programs are in achieving its goals of educating young children about differences, and social issues. The studies range from informal questionnaires and evaluations to formal research studies conducted by trained researchers. The results attest to the positive effect of the Kids on the Block’s unique presentations.

One such study concluded that KOB Child Abuse programs significantly contributed to the number of disclosures in the county with approximately  one-third of the reports most likely being directly related to performances at the schools. These statistics and this research indicated that if more school were to receive KOB programs the number of disclosures would likely increase. They stated that Kids on the Block should receive permanment funding as this research demonstrates a clear and direct relationship between the program and child abuse disclosures. 
Program Success Monitored By

Evaluation instruments include four different measures that both qualitatively andquantitatively evaluate our success. They include:

  • Teacher“report cards”: Teachers complete this survey instrument indicating satisfaction from an educator's point of view; using a 4 point scale. This is used for all school performances.
  • Pre/Post test: This test confidentially measures each child’s knowledge before and after the program. Developed by educators, this quick 10-questiontest includes forms for varied reading and comprehension levels. Used for selected programs.
  • KeyPhrase Tool: Student letters and pictures sent to our "Kids" are examined for certain phrases that indicate learning. This tool was developed by researchers and the national KOB office and is used for selected programs.
  • Puppeteer observations and debriefing: Following each performance, puppeteers discuss the conversations they had with children, teachers, and counselors. They note the level of interaction with students during the performance and the Question and Answer session. They debrief on ways to improve the performance and or interaction.
Examples of Program Success

We recently had a social worker report to us that a young lady she was working with had disclosed that she had been sexually abuse. The report came four years after seeing the Kids on the Block Child Abuse program. However, she attributed the KOB program for giving her the knowledge and courage to make the accusation against her perpetrator. Although, we know situations like this are not unusual, it is rare that we have someone come to us to tell us to keep doing what we are doing...it is making a difference.

Description
Safety issues programs deal with personal safety and prevention skills and address an emerging area of concern for children and adults alike. These programs are designed to explain and define certain safety concerns, and provide various problem solving techniques and intervention strategies. These programs encourage children to be secure and confident in their own perceptions of right and wrong and to reject unacceptable behavior in others. The puppets get kids talking about safety issues during these interactive presentations which features a question and answer period between the puppet characters and the audience. These programs support best practices and promote healthy attitudes that help kids realize how important it is to stay safe and healthy.
 
This group of programs includes: Bullies and School Safety, Water Safety and First Aid, Fire Safety, and Bike Safety.
Budget 450.
Category
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years), Families, At-Risk Populations
Program Long term Success


Numerous organizations cite Kids on the Block programs as being innovative, promising or utilizing best practices. A number of studies have determined KOB programs  to effectively achieve their goals of educating young audiences about safety issues.The studies range from informal questionnaires and evaluations to formal research studies conducted by trained researchers. The results have been positive.

One study assessing a KOB prevention program determined that the awareness of 4 and 5 year olds regarding general safety skills increased after seeing the performance.Their research showed a significant increase in the children's knowledge of safety skills. In addition they stated KOB's prevention programs were a worthwhile investment of any organization. Concluding that by providing children with information about personal safety children are provided with the power to get help if needed and learn who to go to in case of emergency.
  

 
 
Program Success Monitored By

Evaluation instruments include four different measures that both qualitatively andquantitatively evaluate our success. They include:

  • Teacher“report cards”: Teachers complete this survey instrument indicating satisfaction from an educator's point of view; using a 4 point scale. This is used for all school performances.
  • Pre/Post test: This test confidentially measures each child’s knowledge before and after the program. Developed by educators, this quick 10-question test includes forms for varied reading and comprehension levels. Used for selected programs.
  • KeyPhrase Tool: Student letters and pictures sent to our "Kids" are examined for certain key phrases that indicate learning. This tool was developed by researchers and the national KOB office and is used for selected programs.
  • Puppeteer observations and debriefing: Following each performance, puppeteers discuss the conversations they had with children, teachers, and counselors. They note the level of interaction with students during the performance and the Question and Answer session. They debrief on ways to improve the performance and or interaction.
Examples of Program Success

My 5 year old daughter came home from Kindergarten and started telling me how to deal with Bullies. I listened to my child site exactly what you would do if you had personally had an experience or witnessed an encounter where someone was the victim of a bully. After she finished I asked where and how she learned what she just told me, she quickly responded the Kids on the Block taught me. Next she described how neat the puppets were and went on and on about the how the puppets acted and what they said in regards to bullies.

After this happened I met DaVita Warren (our previous Executive Director) at a Chamber Function and told her how impressed I was with what my daughter shared about the KOB teaching her how to deal with a bully.  I know there are many other children that have gone home and recited the same story to their parents. Kids on the Block works to educate children on many of the difficult challenges they encounter and the bottom line is………..it works!

   
Dan M. Harbison
President & CEO
NMLS #625953

Program Comments
CEO Comments
1.  When my daughter was only 5 years old she came home and started telling me how to deal with Bullies. I listened to her site exactly what you would do if you had an experience or witnessed an encounter where someone was the victim of a bully. I asked how she learned that, she quickly responded  Kids on the Block taught me. Next she described how neat the puppets were and how the puppets acted and what they said in regards to bullies.
 
After this, I met our previous Executive Director and told her how impressed I was with what my daughter had shared about the KOB teaching her how to deal with a bully. Shortly afterwards she approached me about serving on the Board. I must say as President/CEO of a local bank I didn’t need to take on another Board with a non-profit since I was already serving on several others, but I didn’t hesitate to say “yes”, the reason, I knew firsthand the good work of Kids on the Block. I have served over 10 years and still get excited about the impact KOB had on my daughter and I know there are many other children that have gone home and recited the same story to their parents.

 I tell all new Board Members, you don’t understand the impact of KOB until you actually see the reaction of the kids watching a show, they ask the puppets questions and interact with them in a way I can’t describe, you just have to witness it to understand it.

Kids on the Block educates children on many of the difficult challenges they encounter and the bottom line is...it works!
 
 
 
2.I am proud to serve on the board for KOB. It is a great organization that delivers important messages through a unique art of puppetry that leaves a lasting impression. I can still remember KOB coming to my school when I was younger. I am so happy that we are helping ensure that my children will have the same experiences.
 
 
3. KOB does not provide a direct service - like feeding the hungry. We work to educate children and thereby prevent bad things from happening. Part of why I work with KOB is that very challenge. It is hard to prove prevention worked, it can be difficult to prove your organization is worth funding.
 
That is also one of our challenges. We address that through the evaluations completed by teachers, by keeping/reviewing student notes and drawing, by providing training to puppeteers related to disclosures, etc.
 
Another reason I love working with KOB is the adoration of the kids. They all know our "kids," and that's a really cool thing.

4. I was contacted by KOB years ago because I am a quickbooks user and they needed an interim treasurer with quickbooks knowledge. When I joined the board, I always thought it would be a temporary position. I attended a KOB show as part of orientation and became hooked. The show was about sharing and was attended by first graders. The look in their eyes as they watched was indescribable. The life size puppets were real to these kids and they were completely engaged in the show. I admire how KOB teaches children about real life issues and encourages discussion with the puppets about these issues.

On a deeper level, KOB also teaches about things that should never happen to a child. A KOB program allows children the opportunity to voice bad things that may be happening in their home environment. When that happens, KOB has allowed children to receive help for a problem that may have never found a voice. To see even one of those instances makes the program more worthwhile than words can describe.

Plans & Policies
Organization has a Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has a Strategic Plan? Under Development
Management Succession Plan? No
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Collaborations
Our collaborative efforts most often consist of KOB providing gratis programs for various local clubs, organizations, etc. However, collaboration extends into the community with our fundraising projects. Some of the groups for which we have recently collaborated are:
WKYU-PBS Family Fun Day - Performances
Camp Happy Days - Performances
BRASS - Performances for children in their facility.
United Way - Day of Caring
Kiwanis - Stand for Children Day
Scotty's Construction - Scotty's Pound the Pavement Kids Run
Western Kentucky University - Big Red Blitz
Hopkins Nursing Facility - Programs for residents.
Progressive Agriculture Safety Day - Performances
Boys & Girls Club - Performances
Active Day - Performances 
Awards
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
The Champion for Children AwardBowling Green Warren County Community Education2010
Family EducationWarren County Family Literacy, BGTC Adult Health Ed. Dept.2009
Governor's Citation of ExcellenceGovernor's Office2006
Community Unity AwardBowling Green - Warren County Community Unity Committee1998
Proclimation Kids on the Block DayBowling Green - Warren County1995
Community Service AwardMayor's Commission on Employment and Disability Issues1991
Community Human RelationsHuman Right's Commission1990
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the Government? No
Financials
Revenue vs Expenses - All Years
Expense Breakdown - Recent Year
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01, 2014
Fiscal Year End Dec 31, 2014
Projected Revenue $177,500.00
Projected Expenses $177,500.00
Endowment Value $102,974.00
Spending Policy Income plus capital appreciation
Detailed Financials
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available). Revenue from foundations and corporations may be included in individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201220112010
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
------
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified------
Individual Contributions$60,840$80,173$69,181
------
$2,772$3,618$428
Investment Income, Net of Losses$6,122$2,808$3,234
Membership Dues------
Special Events$65,982$63,646$68,679
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$186$217$1,240
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201220112010
Program Expense--$130,106$69,480
Administration Expense--$18,578$36,194
Fundraising Expense--$20,276$55,907
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.930.890.88
Program Expense/Total Expenses0%77%43%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%14%41%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201220112010
Total Assets$311,612$321,742$341,970
Current Assets$112,603$114,038$115,041
Long-Term Liabilities--$85,792$87,056
Current Liabilities$87,383$4,713$5,149
Total Net Assets$224,229$231,237$249,765
Form 990s
2013 990EZ 2013
2012 990 EZ
2011 990EZ
2010 990 EZ
2009 990EZ
2008 990EZ
2007 990
Audit Documents
2011 Financial Audit
2010 Audit
2009 Audit
2008 Audit
2007 Audit
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
State Registration Yes
Comments
CEO Comments
1. A the Dec. 2011 board meeting, the members of the board reviewed and addressed the issue regarding allocation of expenses. It was noted that KOB has used the same method of allocating expenses since we became a tax exempt, non-profit organization in 1989. Over the past 23 years our organization has expanded and become more sophisticated as demand for our services has grown. Due to this growth, the board approved a resolution to more accurately reflect expense categories. The 2011 financial audit will more accurately reflect the appropriate expense categories.
2.One of the largest challenges facing KOB and every smaller non-profit organization is staff retention. With our limited funds, it is hard to compete with the wages and benefits paid in the for-profit world. This leads to a higher than we would like turnover rate. We address this challenge by continually looking to increase funding sources. In the event of a turnover, we provide excellent training so that all employees are prepared for their workday.
 

3. Of course, like all non-profits, continued funding is our main challenge. We hold four fundraisers each year to help pay for the operational expenses of running the office and maintaining the vehicles.

We purchased a building in 2007 which actually lowered our rent cost. Our challenge now is to be able to make some repairs and do some much needed remodeling. We are looking at ways to make this happen through volunteers,donations, and other funding efforts.

Another challenge we face is maintaining a stable puppeteer staff due to the fact that we are not able to offer benefits. Most usually the staff we hire needs access to group medical insurance and we are currently not able to offer that. The vast majority of our staff changes are due to the fact that they leave for a job that offers benefits. We are exploring ways to fund a health reimbursement account as a partial solution to that problem.

 
Address 958 Collett Avenue
Bowling Green, KY 42101
Primary Phone 270 842-2259
Contact Email ashleykob@yahoo.com
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Ashley Reynolds
Board Chair Mrs Johna Rodgers
Board Chair Company Affiliation GREC