Home of the Innocents
1100 East Market Street
Louisville KY 40206-1838
Contact Information
Nonprofit Home of the Innocents
Address 1100 East Market Street
Louisville, KY 40206 1838
Phone (502) 596-1000
Fax 502 596-1410
Contact Name Paul Robinson
At A Glance
IRS Ruling Year 1880
Other ways to donate, support, or volunteer

Home of the Innocents recognizes that a diverse funding base is essential for an organization's fiscal stability and long-term health. The Home works diligently each year to further expand its revenue sources and maintains a multifaceted, wide-ranging revenue base for its programs and services. Approximately 80% of the Home's revenue comes from the state for the care of children in Emergency Shelter & Residential Services and in the Kosair Charities Pediatric Convalescent Center. The remaining 20%, or about $5 million dollars, must be raised from public and private sources each year, including unrestricted donations from individuals and corporations, planned giving, and special events. To help maximize each donation, the Home participates in matching gift programs of employers whenever possible. In-kind gifts save the Home hundreds of thousands of dollars a year and provide clothing, toys, personal care items, furniture, supplies, and much more for the children.


Volunteers are utilized as an important component of services at Home of the Innocents. Our volunteers are critical to the Home's success. We offer many opportunities for individuals, groups, and students in all areas of the Home, and welcome experts in relevant fields (social services, marketing, IT, health care, etc.) to share their knowledge to benefit the work of Home of the Innocents employees. Volunteer recruitment, screening, training, and supervision is handled by the Home's full-time Volunteer Services Manager, Julie Spry (502-596-1031, jspry@homeoftheinnocents.org). All volunteers must submit to a thorough background check, annual TB test, and completion of agency orientation and task specific training.

Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses - All Years
Expense Breakdown - Recent Year
Statements
Mission Statement

Home of the Innocents has been our region's open arms to kids in crisis since 1880. The Home provides therapeutic, loving care to children who are victims of abuse, abandonment, and neglect; children who are medically fragile; children with other behavioral health diagnoses; and families with a host of exceptional needs. Our mission is to be a community of dedicated people who provide the skills and opportunities by which vulnerable children, youth, and their families may improve their lives.

Background Statement

Home of the Innocents has been our region's open arms to kids in crisis since 1880. In its early years, the Home was known as a place that received young children and infants when their families were unable to care for them due to poverty, illness, or other overwhelming circumstances. Over the years, these services transitioned to primarily serving children who had experienced abuse, neglect, or abandonment. In 1975, Home of the Innocents assumed the responsibility of caring for another vulnerable population, the medically fragile children housed at the Jewish Home for Convalescent Children, which operated from 1908-1975. Today, the Home continues to provide services to medically fragile children, as well as abandoned, abused, neglected, and homeless children; children with other behavioral health diagnoses; and families with a host of exceptional needs.

Impact Statement

The agency was incorporated by a special legislative act on April 23, 1880, to “provide for the comfort and care of children of poor families, children of working and destitute mothers, and protection of the latter.” At that time, the Home was able to accommodate eight children. During the last 136 years, Home of the Innocents has grown to meet the needs of our community in a number of significant ways. Last year, over 8,500 individuals received care through one of the Home’s multiple child-centered services. Home of the Innocents has three major service divisions: ChildKind Center, Kosair Charities Pediatric Convalescent Center, and Open Arms Children’s Health. The Home also provides community-based and foster care services from satellite offices located in Lexington and Elizabethtown in Kentucky and New Albany, Indiana.

Needs Statement

80% of the Home’s revenue is from the state for the care of children who have been abused, need 24-hour medical care or who are receiving medical care, dental care, and/or hearing testing. The remaining 20% is raised from public and private sources.

CEO/Executive Director Statement

I began my tenure at Home of the Innocents in June 2016. Over the past year, I've gotten very attached to kids who live on our campus, the amazing staff who carry out our mission, and the wonderful communities that support it all.

Fiscal Year 2017 was a big year for the Home. We served more than 8,500 children and their families; a large increase over the nearly 7,000 we had served just two years ago. Clearly the need for the many services we provide continues to grow, even as we find we need to diversify our quest for necessary resources even more.

Perhaps most notably, the organization has undergone an executive transition with Fiscal Year 2016 being the farewell for long-time President and CEO, Gordon Brown. It is Gordon's legacy I am honored to follow. His is a legacy of growth. His passion and commitment to the children of Kentucky drove him through two capital campaigns and tireless work to create the Joan E. Thomas, MD children's village at the end of East Market Street. With 17 buildings, over 20 acres, and a huge array of services, Home of the Innocents has become a vital piece of Louisville's social fabric.

Just as important is sustainability. It's the difficult lifting that has to be done to maintain the quality of service that Gordon has created. I am committed to creating a legacy of sustainability at Home of the Innocents during my tenure. I certainly have the board of directors, staff, volunteers, donors, and community support to make that happy. Together we are working to make sure the children of our state always have the Home.

Service Categories
Secondary Organization Category Human Services / Foster Care
Tertiary Organization Category Health Care / Ambulatory & Primary Health Care
Geographic Areas Served
Areas
In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Kentucky

Home of the Innocents serves children from all regions of Kentucky and Southern Indiana. The Home provides foster care and community-based services from satellite offices in Lexington and Elizabethtown in Kentucky and in New Albany, Indiana.

Impact Questions
GoalsHelpWhat is the organization aiming to accomplish? This is the organization's ultimate goal for intended impact.

Home of the Innocents (the Home) is where Louisville’s vulnerable children and youth find emotional, physical, and intellectual support that can transform their lives.

The Home provides our community with a range of important residential, treatment and community-based programs, more details of which can be found in the services section of this website.

Our programs include offering a safe haven for at-risk children; pediatric medical care; shelter and education for pregnant and parenting teens; crisis and intervention services; clinical treatment services and therapeutic loving foster and adoption services.

The Home also operates a pediatric convalescent center for children who are dependent on technology to sustain life, as well as children who are terminally ill.

Thanks to our many supporters, we operate world-class facilities that impact children’s lives throughout our region. For many of these children, this is where hope begins.

Home of the Innocents (the Home) is where Louisville’s vulnerable children and youth find emotional, physical, and intellectual support that can transform their lives.  The Home provides our community with a range of important residential, treatment and community-based programs, which include: a safe haven for at-risk children, pediatric medical care, shelter and education for pregnant and parenting teens, crisis and intervention services, clinical treatment services, and therapeutic loving foster and adoption services.

The Home also operates a pediatric convalescent center for children who are dependent on technology to sustain life, as well as children who are terminally ill.

Thanks to our many supporters, we operate world-class facilities that impact children’s lives throughout our region. For many of these children, this is where hope begins. The Home really is the heart of our city and our region. We serve children and families from counties throughout Kentucky and Southern Indiana, and we are looking for opportunities to expand our foster care and community-based services offered from satellite offices in Lexington and Elizabethtown in Kentucky and in New Albany, Indiana.

StrategiesHelpWhat are the organization's strategies for its stated long-term goals?
Since 1880--before the great buildings and parks, before the famous names and celebrated events--the Home has been here in Louisville providing the at-risk children and families in our community the important residential and community-based programs they need to become strong again. We believe that by working together with our communities, we can transform the health of our state's future, the health of our state's families, and the health of our state's children.
 

Since 1880—before the great buildings and parks, before the famous names and celebrated events—the Home has been here in Louisville providing the at-risk children and families in our community the important residential and community-based programs they need to become strong again. We believe that by working together with our communities, we can transform the health of our state's future, the health of our state's families, and the health of our state's children.

Our communities make a difference for children at Home of the Innocents in various ways. Volunteers play an important role, helping in various departments and programs. We focus on making sure our volunteers have meaningful experiences interacting with our kids and our staff. It is equally hard to put into words the impact our donors have on the Home—and our gratitude for that impact. Our donors save and transform our children's lives. From the financial support our donors provide the Home that allows us to find the best professional staff and modern equipment, to donations of everyday items most people take for granted, there are a number of ways that the community is involved and helps the Home. It takes a village to raise a child. The Home has built that village. To be sustainable, we continue to look for and expand current opportunities to engage our community and keep the public involved in this important work.

CapabilitiesHelpWhat are the organization’s capabilities for doing this? What resources, capacities, and connections support its progress towards long-term goals?

The Home was founded in 1880 by Dr. James Taylor Helm, Episcopalian minister of Christ Church in Louisville. In 1972 we moved to a facility at 505 East Chestnut Street. Soon after, we took over child care programs previously run by the County government and pediatric services formerly provided by the Jewish Home for Convalescent Children.

After more than a century of modest growth, the Home then expanded rapidly between 1995 and 2015. That expansion was made possible primarily through the creation of the Joan E. Thomas Children’s Village in 2003. The 20-acre village, located in what we now call NuLu, provides sufficient space and amenities to enable the Home to accommodate the needs of our community’s vulnerable children.

As the Home now approaches one-and-a-half centuries of providing care, hope, and love for our society’s most vulnerable; we now offer care and assistance to over 8,500 children and families each year. The Home has come a long way from its humble beginnings. Yet our mission remains the same. With 17 buildings, over 20 acres, a huge array of services, a dedicated board of directors, and a loving team of over 600 staff, the Home has become a vital piece of Louisville’s—and the state of Kentucky’s—social fabric.

IndicatorsHelpHow will the organization know if it is making progress? What are the key qualitative and quantitative indicators against which the organization assesses its progress toward its intended impact?

Indicators of ongoing success will include, among several others: the number of children successfully placed in foster care through the Home's Therapeutic Loving [Foster] Care & Adoption (TLC) program; the number of children adopted through TLC; the number of children reunified with birth families through the TLC program; the number of children served in Kentucky and Indiana through community-based services; the number of children cared for in the Kosair Charities Pediatric Convalescent Center; the number of children, families, and individuals who use the Kay and Jim Morrisey Advanced Therapy Center's saltwater therapy pool; the number of homeless young adults and their children served through the Aftercare Program; the number of patient visits at Open Arm's Children's Health; the number of volunteer visits and volunteer hours; the number of students graduating from our on-campus Weinberg Academy; and the number of parents who attend and graduate from our PASS parenting classes.

ProgressHelpWhat has and hasn’t been accomplished so far?

In 2017, Home of the Innocents served over 8,500 children and their families. This is a huge increase over the 7,000 we had served just two years ago, and includes children and families living in counties all across Kentucky and Southern Indiana. The new counties we served this past year reflect our intended growth in offering foster care and community-based services throughout our region, in the communities where the need is greatest. The Home has learned that to continue this growth, we will need to expand our staff in order to expand our services. To increase staff and services, we must expand our funding sources and donors within these other communities, in effect helping donors and grantmakers to reinvest in their own community and people. The Home already operates satellite offices in Lexington, Elizabethtown, and New Albany, and we recognize the need to enhance and modernize our communication abilities. One such effort in this vein, the Home has already adopted Red e App, a secure mobile messaging and file sharing platform that is specifically designed for hourly and non-desk employees without access to @company.com email.

Board Chair
Board Chair Howard Holloman
Company Affiliation Customer Fulfillment, General Electric
Term July 2017 to June 2018
Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Julee Carucci Civic VolunteerVoting
Howard Holloman General ElectricVoting
Remy Noble Humana FoundationVoting
Kathy Pellegrino Humana, retiredVoting
Maury Young First Savings BankVoting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 26
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 20
Female 10
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 63%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 12
Board Co-Chair
Board CoChair Julee Carucci
Company Affiliation Civic Volunteer
Standing Committees
Executive
Finance
Program / Program Planning
Human Resources / Personnel
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Nominating
Ethics
Audit
CEO/Executive Director
Executive Director Mr. Paul W. Robinson
Term Start Aug 2016
Email probinson@homeoftheinnocents.org
Experience

After more than 25 years at Home of the Innocents, and an entire career dedicated to serving children, Gordon Brown has retired. The Board of Directors conducted a lengthy and thorough search for his replacement and has selected Paul W. Robinson as the new President & CEO of Home of the Innocents. Mr. Robinson has a background in business, entrepreneurship, and non-profit organizations. Prior to returning to his hometown of Louisville, he spent 21 years as an owner and operator of 19 successful Papa John’s Pizza franchises in Florida, which have since been sold. His return to Louisville coincides with his desire to pursue his passion for community service. Mr. Robinson served as a director of the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Northwest Florida for 12 years, including a term as board chair, where he cultivated a strong financial base as well as strategic direction for the charity’s expanding mission and facilities. Mr. Robinson also devoted his time to the community by serving various roles for Habitat for Humanity and the Sacred Heart Cathedral School. Mr. Robinson’s business experience and his passion for serving families and children in need make him an excellent choice for maintaining and enhancing the Home’s long tradition of community service.

Staff
Full Time Staff 400
Part Time Staff 185
Volunteers 100
Contractors 28
Retention Rate 65%
Management Reports to Board? Yes
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 185
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 328
Hispanic/Latino 16
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 14 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 100
Female 453
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title President and CEO
Title CFO, Senior VP Finance/Operations
Title Senior VP Human Resources
Title Senior VP ChildKind Center
Title Senior VP Kosair Charities Pediatric Convalescent Center
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
NonManagement Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Description Crisis Care and Residential Treatment Services provide emergency and long-term shelter, group and individual therapy, crisis intervention, and respite services for children from birth to age 18 who are victims of abuse, abandonment, neglect, or family crisis. Children are accepted 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Residents of the Home attend on-campus Jefferson County Public Schools located in the Weinberg Academy and Discovery Classrooms.
Budget 4660538
Category Human Services, General/Other Residential Care
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years), ,
Program Short Term Success Children & young people served by Home of the Innocents will have immediate basic needs met.
Program Long term Success Children in crisis will remain in or be transitioned into healthy, safe, and secure home settings. Children and youth will stabilize educationally through regular school attendance or other educational programming.
Program Success Monitored By Measuring program outcomes is an activity to which Home of the Innocents has been fully committed for many years. The agency has repeatedly seen the benefit of this activity in the continual enhancement of the quality and effectiveness of its programming. Each year, the process of measuring and examining the results of program outcomes brings to light new insights and challenges. Key to this process for the Home is its Program Services Committee. This committee of the Board of Directors meets monthly throughout the year to provide oversight and to review results. Each month, staff of a particular program report on the specifics of the program, such as its clients, services, challenges, and successes (outcomes). The Home's commitment is further evidenced by its having created a senior management position responsible for quality improvement. The Vice President of Quality Improvement reports at least quarterly to the Programs Services Committee and works year-round to ensure compliance with the standards of the Council on Accreditation.
Examples of Program Success Home of the Innocents celebrated eight high school graduations this year from our on-campus school, the Weinberg Academy.
Description

The Kosair Charities Pediatric Convalescent Center (KCPCC) is a pediatric nursing home for children ages birth through 21 who have severe disabilities that require 24-hour skilled nursing care. KCPCC cares for children with a variety of diagnoses and medical needs. Some are dependent on ventilators and feeding tubes; most require wheelchairs for mobility and have limited verbal communication abilities. KCPCC is Kentucky’s only center of excellence for children’s long-term nursing needs. The goal of the KCPCC is to provide a home-like setting for medically fragile children where our dedicated staff can help both children and their families live fulfilling, quality lives. Children residing at the KCPCC receive individualized care from an experienced team of doctors, nurses, and therapists. Interventions such as physical, occupational and respiratory therapies as well as speech and hearing services allow children to develop, learn, and communicate. The Home is deeply committed to the principle of “child first, patient second.” Our residents engage in daily educational opportunities at community- and campus-based schools, and enjoy fun activities such as swimming in the Home’s heated aquatic therapy pool and participating in art therapy through a partnership with the Kentucky Center’s Arts in Healing Program.

Budget 13621647
Category Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served People/Families with of People with Disabilities, People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities, People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities
Program Long term Success Children with medically complex conditions will receive the therapeutic services and 24-hour skilled nursing care they need. For each child's life and happiness, the Home is committed to the principle of "child first, patient second."
Examples of Program Success Kosair Charities Pediatric Convalescent Center (KCPCC) provided 24-hour skilled nursing care for 95 residents in FY17. KCPCC has more than once been awarded the honor of being among the best nursing homes in Kentucky in U.S. News & World Report, with a 5-star ranking for health inspections, nurse staffing, and measures of medical quality of care. The program also celebrated a zero-deficiency rating their annual state survey. KCPCC regularly receives 6-figure grants from the WHAS Crusade for Children to facilitate the KCPCC program and necessary, state-of-the-art equipment for our children.
Description

Open Arms Children’s Health is an integrated health care facility offering pediatric medical, dental, hearing, vision, pharmacy, as well as speech, physical, and occupational therapies. It is open to the public, and specifically targets kids with special needs, low-income families, and children in foster care. Open Arms can address multiple issues across disciplines in a same-day visit. Our medical professionals provide pediatric primary care, immunizations, annual well checks, sick visits, sports physicals, and back to school physicals for kids ages birth to 18. Open Arms operates 4 dental suites, including one “Quiet Room” for children who experience behavioral disruptions. Lab and radiology services are also available. Village Pharmacy is conveniently located next to Open Arms, provides specialized prescription compounding for kids in the Home’s care, and serves the community as a retail pharmacy. All Pharmacy-generated revenue contributes to support of other Home services.

Budget 4635917
Category Health Care, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years), People/Families with of People with Disabilities, Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Examples of Program Success

Open Arms Children's Health continues to grow to meet the needs of children in our community. In the last year, 5,710 children and teens visited our medical and dental offices for services. Open Arms also received grant funding from Humana to expand our integrated healthcare model and from a family foundation for expansion of the Open Arms 3rd floor.

Description

Community Based Services (CBS) offers a variety of programs preventive in nature and designed to help at-risk families avoid the need for more intensive services. Clinical specialists provide intensive in-home therapy for children with behavioral healthcare needs and developmental disabilities. (Service goals range from decreasing a child’s risk of psychiatric hospitalization to learning independent living skills and improving communication.) Aftercare helps at-risk young adults ages 18-24 transition to self-sufficient living. Safe Exchange provides a safe, neutral site for regular custody exchanges for divorced or separated parents with a history of domestic violence. Parents Acquiring Skills & Strength (PASS) offers free parent education classes and support groups to families. Psychological Services provide behavioral assessments and diagnostic testing that provide the foundation for effective treatment with Behavioral Health Services.

Budget 1818553
Category Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years), People/Families with of People with Disabilities, Homeless
Examples of Program Success

Aftercare has a permanent supportive housing grant through the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) that served 99 homeless young adults and their 105 dependents in 2017. Parents Acquiring Skills and Strength (PASS) served 482 individuals in Kentucky and Indiana. Families completing the program consistently show progress in the areas assessed by the Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory, a standardized testing instrument measuring appropriate parental expectations, empathy, behaviors and values. Safe Exchange facilitated between 400 and 425 custody exchanges each month, serving a total of 560 individuals last year.

Description

The Kay and Jim Morrissey Advanced Therapy Center (ATC) and Pediatric Outpatient Rehab services offer rehabilitative therapies. The ATC features an innovative saltwater therapy pool and large therapy gym. Fully accessible for individuals with special needs, the therapy pool is equipped with a chair/stretcher-lift, entry ramp, exercise benches, and specialized floatation devices. The pool uses a state-of-the-art UV filter and is heated to 92 degrees for enhanced therapeutic benefit. The ATC offers innovative aquatic therapy opportunities for Home residents and clients, and classes for individuals of all ages from the community. The Pediatric Outpatient Rehab program offers speech and occupational therapy to kids of all ages. Speech-language pathologists can evaluate and treat language, articulation, voice, fluency, and feeding/swallowing disorders, dependent upon the child’s needs. Occupational Therapy addresses physical, cognitive, psychosocial, and sensory-perceptual performance.

Category None of the above
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years), General/Unspecified,
Examples of Program Success The Kay and Jim Morrissey Advanced Therapy Center (ATC) had 1,386 visitors last year. The therapy pool's most popular program is Baby Splash, aimed at children ages 6 months to 3 years to help acclimate them with water and teach life saving skills. The ATC also offers swim lessons for children with autism in collaboration with Families for Effective Autism Treatment (FEAT) of Louisville.
Program Comments
CEO Comments The Kosair Charities Pediatric Convalescent Center (KCPCC) provides residential care for children who are severely and profoundly disabled. They require 24-hour care. The programs of the ChildKind Center (CKC) include crisis care and residential treatment services for children who are victims of abuse/abandonment/neglect/homelessness, community-based services to keep children at home, foster care, and parent education, and support groups. The Hockensmith Pediatric Assessment Center provides medical, dental, psycho-social, psychiatric, radiology, audiology, pharmacy, and family assessment and treatment services for children who are at-risk and/or disabled. The Kay and Jim Morrissey Advanced Therapy Center incorporates a large therapy space/gym/stage area and a specialized therapy pool. The Harry & Jeanette Weinberg Academy is a 3-room schoolhouse serving kids in the Home’s care.
Plans & Policies
Organization has a Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has a Strategic Plan? Yes
Management Succession Plan? Yes
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
United Way Member Agency1975
Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization2006
External Assessments and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
Council on Accreditation (COA) [for Children and Family Services] - Accreditation2010
Awards
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Samaritan Award - Not for Profit OrganizationPersonal Counseling Service2010
Community ImpactPhoenix Award2004
Not-for-Profit Organization of the YearBusiness First of Louisville2009
CFO of the Year, Michael O'BrienBusiness First of Louisville2010
Art of Leadership Award, Gordon S. Brown, President & CEOCenter for Non-Profit Excellence2008
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the Government? Yes
Financials
Revenue vs Expenses - All Years
Expense Breakdown - Recent Year
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start July 01, 2017
Fiscal Year End June 30, 2018
Projected Revenue $36,798,331.00
Projected Expenses $38,825,505.00
Endowment Value $19,785,256.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Detailed Financials
Revenue and ExpensesHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Revenue$33,053,725$33,532,057$32,974,682
Total Expenses$35,376,584$32,564,518$31,150,764
Revenue Less Expenses($2,322,859)$967,539$1,823,918
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available). Revenue from foundations and corporations may be included in individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
------
Government Contributions$1,698,013$1,614,903$1,558,799
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$1,698,013$1,614,903$1,558,799
Individual Contributions$2,871,083$4,258,540$5,219,888
$450,792$463,445$584,022
$27,041,956$26,055,270$24,336,233
Investment Income, Net of Losses$506,351$680,531$663,449
Membership Dues--$0$0
Special Events$168,666$225,421$248,176
Revenue In-Kind--$145,224$152,706
Other$316,864$233,947$364,115
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$27,409,546$29,691,764$28,423,164
Administration Expense--$2,275,386$2,118,575
Fundraising Expense$410,695$597,368$609,025
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.931.031.06
Program Expense/Total Expenses77%91%91%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue8%9%8%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$76,684,733$87,331,373$93,480,850
Current Assets$14,020,834$22,223,168$28,051,578
Long-Term Liabilities$11,556,082$19,346,989$27,391,541
Current Liabilities$2,733,829$3,080,340$2,575,705
Total Net Assets$62,394,822$64,904,044$63,513,604
Form 990s
2016 Form 990
2015 Form 990
2014 Form 990
2013 990
2012 990
2011 990 2011
2010 990 2010
2009 Form 990
2008 Form 990
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
State Registration Yes
Address 1100 East Market Street
Louisville, KY 402061838
Primary Phone 502 596-1000
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Paul W. Robinson
Board Chair Howard Holloman
Board Chair Company Affiliation Customer Fulfillment, General Electric